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Coachella Expanding to Two Weekends in April 2012

The mad scientists behind one of our country's best music fests just made quite the earth-shaking announcement: Coachella 2012 will take place over the course of two weekends in April. It'll give rabid fans who got shafted this year, due to insanely fast ticket sales, a better chance at scoring tickets and experiencing the festival in all its sweaty, dirty glory.

The weirdest part about the announcement? Three-day passes go on sale in two days, a good chunk of the year before they usually reveal the lineup. They're the same price as always ($269 plus fees), but would you drop that kind of dough on a lineup that likely hasn't even materialized in the brains of Coachella's organizers yet?

Sleigh Bells, Neon Indian Slay Hearts and Minds at the Independent

Last night’s Sleigh Bells/Neon Indian show at the Independent was one of those nights we’ll recall 20 years from now when we’re explaining to our robot doctor why we’ve gone partially deaf:

“Why didn’t you wear ear plugs?” the doctor will ask, unfamiliar with human masochism.
“Well. It was f-ing’ Sleigh Bells doc. They’re gloriously loud, and we didn’t want to miss a decibel,” we’ll say sans regret, adding “that’s kind of the point with some bands. Now fix me.”

Knight Fellows on "Re-Engineering Journalism"

One of the hottest debates inside newsrooms and media studies programs the past few years is whether journalism itself has any real future left, given the widespread disruptions sweeping through the traditional media industry, including the massive layoffs of newspaper reporters.

In light of this, the 45-year-old Knight Fellowship Program at Stanford has transformed itself from a mid-career sabbatical opportunity into an incubator of entrepreneurial ideas that just might help journalism better adapt and survive.

The current 20 Knight Fellows, 12 of whom come from overseas, presented their visions late last week at an event called "Re-Engineering Journalism."

Jigar Mehta, a video journalist affiliated with The New York Times, created a crowd-sourced, interactive documentary called "18 Days in Egypt," which encouraged Egyptians to contibute videos, photos, e-mails and tweets from their cellphones during their historic uprising earlier this year.

The Edenites, New Play About San Francisco at the Exit

Drama as therapy, stylish theatrical fluff, sincere expression of love for our fair city—all are playwright-proclaimed possibilities here. A world premiere about San Francisco, The Edenites tells the stories of over-sexed trust fund babies, sci-fi geeks, bisexual socialites, famous writers, exes and new parents, and the world’s smartest roommate—stories that may sound alarmingly like your real life. (Depending on how many gay man dramas and debutantes your real life contains.) 

Online Dating Meets The Rest of Technology: SwoonXO

If the thought of writing another dating profile makes you want to 1) thwack your head firmly against your desk, 2) stay single forever because it's easier than trying to be charming yet humble via the written word, 3) stand up and yell about how even Hemingway would've sucked at this - well, you might just be in luck. The internet and the wonders of technology are conspiring in your favor. 

Scene of the City: SF Carnaval

For this week's Scenes of the City we hung out on Saturday and Sunday in the Mission capturing the Carnaval celebrations. Dancing, smiles and lots of good times made for a unforgettable two days.

Tracy Morgan Talks Dirty at Cobb's

Anyone who has witnessed Bob Saget do stand-up or Dustin “Screech” Diamond do porn knows the actors' off-camera sensibilities do not always align with their television personalities. And perhaps it’s no surprise that some of our most endearing fictional network TV heroes are actually some of our crudest, gutter-minded citizens. Everyone needs a release from their day job, right?

This Week's Hottest Events: Adele, Iron & Wine, and Flight of the Conchords' Arj Barker

Music
Iron & Wine
Sam Beam's mopey mix of folk rock means a mellow night at the Warfield. Brush up on this year's Kiss Each Other Clean before you try to sneak in to the sold-out show. 
When: 8 p.m., Wed. 6/1
Where: The Warfield, 982 Market St., goldenvoice.com

Naomie Harris Goes Back to School for Festival Standout 'The First Grader'

For some, it’s a recurring nightmare, the dream that they’re back in school again. For Naomie Harris, star of the Toronto Film Festival favorite The First Grader, it was a job requirement.
 
At first, Harris, who plays an elementary-school teacher in a classroom with dozens of Kenyan children and one 84-year-old villager, was puzzled by director Justin Chadwick’s request that she actually teach class. With a younger brother and sister, she didn’t feel she needed to prove she could work with kids. But the lesson proved a blessing.
 

San Francisco Opera Goes Epic with Wagner’s Ring Cycle

It might be a stretch to say that this summer’s Ring Cycle is the most epic opera event ever - but not by much. Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen is widely considered one of the greatest operatic works ever created, featuring four operas worth of gods and heroes, great loves and tragic betrayal, dwarves and those ever-popular rings of power. Widely considered one of the leading producers of the cycle, San Francisco Opera pulls out all the stops with a brilliant roster of singers, one of the world’s most acclaimed Wagner conductors, and the vision of internationally celebrated director Francesca Zambello. Suffice it to say, the Ring Cycle’s singing Norse gods and Valkyries get the best treatment possible. 

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