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This Week's Hottest Events: Broken Bells, Beer Pairing Dinners at Monk's Kettle, and Judd Apatow

Music: Broken Bells and Van Morrison
Power alt rock/indie duo Broken Bells—Danger Mouse (aka Brian Burton) and The Shins' lead James Mercer—has been tearing it up on the music scene since their self-titled debut album release earlier this year. Rolling Stone even flagged the cd "the year's coolest left field pop disc" and they've been on perpetual repeat at the 7x7 offices. You want tickets to this one. $30; Tuesday 10/5; The Fox, 1807 Telegraph Ave., Oakland, apeconcerts.com. But, if cutting-edge, new music isn't your scene, you can always splurge on an oldie but goody. Van Morrison's making a stop in SF. Start singing "Brown Eyed Girl" now. $84+; Friday 10/8; Nob Hill Masonic Center, 1111 California St., livenation.com

Smuin Ballet Does The Shins, 'Oh, Inverted World'

Quickly gaining a reputation for pulling some of the world’s finest choreographers to San Francisco, Smuin Ballet’s world premiere of Trey McIntyre’s Oh, Inverted World is a stunner. Set to music by The Shins, McIntyre fully lives up to his reputation as one of the most sought-after choreographers working today.

 

October's Classical Music Roundup: Takacs Quartet, Joshua Bell at SF Symphony and New Spectrum Ensemble

Takacs Quartet

Takacs Quartet, one of the world’s foremost chamber ensembles, takes the San Francisco stage for the first time in more than 20 years. As does Geraldine Walther, who defected from the San Francisco Symphony five years ago to join Takacs Quartet (as a twenty-nine year veteran, she was probably ready for a change of scenery) (not to imply the SF Symphony scenery isn’t a pleasure to behold). Applying their legendary technical skill and musical magnetism to Haydn, Beethoven, and Bartók (a bow to the ensemble’s Hungarian roots), this Grammy- winning group is a one night only offer.

Litquake This Week: Surf Lit, Tales of Hollywood Hell, Jonathan Lethem and Lit Crawl

The Bay Area has long been fertile ground for literary talent - from Jack London to Amy Tan to Dave Eggers. Litquake, now in its 11th year, is our annual celebration of the written word, and it blows through town October 1-9. It's a whirlwind of lectures, parties and lit-events, so pick and choose what suits your fancy, but definitely aim to hit up something. Here are the biggies this week:

 

Arcade Fire Lights Up the Greek Theatre

The bigness of Arcade Fire’s music is made to fill a venue like the Greek. But the bigness of their fan base could have easily filled five.  Last night’s show was so packed that security actually started begging fans to stop pushing their way onto the floor. “We’re gonna have to bulldoze our way through here,” one fan said, eying the sea of wall-to-wall bodies ahead, as a security guy next to him tried to steer people away. “No more room!” he shouted. “There’s no more room down here!”

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

Six rogue filmmakers, including Oscar winner Alex Gibney (Taxi to the Dark Side) and Morgan Spurlock (Super Size Me), question the logic of conventional wisdom and human behavior – often with riotous results – in Freakonomics, the new documentary opening today at Embarcadero. Elsewhere:

Woody Allen Struggles with the Agony of Creation and the Perils of Wish Fulfillment with 'You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger'

Perhaps old dogs can’t be taught new tricks, but many veteran directors are learning to adapt in a Hollywood where sequels, remakes and treatments of popular comics are very much in season.
 
This fall, Stephen Frears, 69, will unveil his first take on a graphic novel, the romantic comedy Tamara Drewe, before tentatively laying the groundwork for a remake of his 1984 thriller The Hit. Oliver Stone, 64, has returned to Wall Street. And, at 67, Martin Scorsese is busy directing his first 3-D fantasy – next winter’s Hugo Cabret – and planning a Taxi Driver sequel.
 

Parking Quiz Answer: Which Violation Makes SF the Most Money Each Year?

A few hours ago, parking know-it-all David LaBua, author of parking bible Finding the Sweet Spot, dared you to guess which parking mistake makes our fair city of San Francisco millions of dollars per year.

Question: What is the most frequently cited parking violation in San Francisco?

A) Meter violations. 

B) Street sweeping violations

C) Double parking by commercial trucks

D) Parking your vehicle in the wrong direction

E) None of the above

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