Skip to Navigation Skip to Content

Arts + Culture

Little Otsu to Close Its Doors on Valencia, But Remain Open on the Internet

Sad news: Mission Local reports that after eight years on Valencia Street, vegan publishing house Little Otsu is closing its doors this December. Run by Jeremy Crown and Yvonne Chen, the lovingly-curated neighborhood shop is a place to grab comics, books, day planners and other adorable knick-knacks.

Double Your Pleasure With The Watson Twins At Cafe Du Nord

Louisville, Ky., has garnered renown as the largest burg in the state, a college basketball epicenter and the home of moodily imaginative post-punk music-makers like Slint and Bonnie “Prince” Billy. How do natives Leigh and Chandra Watson, otherwise known as the Watson Twins, fit in?

Obscura: A Magic Show

Christian Cagigal is a dark little conjurer with a thoughtful view on evil and an experiential one-man show threaded with gothic whimsy. “It won’t be the feel-good show of the year,” he says. But if you let down your defenses, Cagigal promises to give you magic.  

He’s also hatching good-natured plots to steal your soul, so be sure to keep that shit close. (I stuffed mine in an empty wine glass and shoved it under the seat. Seemed to work.)

John Carpenter Invades the Castro Theatre Tonight

Late-breaking news: Midnites for Maniacs programmer Jesse Hawthorne Ficks will be hosting a must-see '80s marathon all day Saturday at the Castro Theatre, featuring Sylvester Stallone's criminally overlooked Nighthawks, Jean-Claude Van Damme kicking ass in Bloodsport, a pair of John Carpenter gems (a newly restored print of Big Trouble in Little China, followed by They Live), and a "secret midnite film" rumored to be none other than Hulk Hogan's No Holds Barred.

Former Giants President Goes to Bat for 'Jews and Baseball'

In nine seasons with the Cleveland Indians, Al Rosen slugged 192 home runs, twice besting all American Leaguers in that category, and, in 1953, came within a single percentage point of winning the sport’s coveted Triple Crown. If not for the broken finger he suffered in 1956, effectively ending his career, he might be a Hall of Famer today.

Rosen, 86, who served as president of the San Francisco Giants from 1985 to ’92, isn’t one to dwell on the past, noting that he would have stayed with the game if he was able to meet the lofty standards he’d set for himself. But he was happy to reflect on his playing days for Peter Miller's new documentary Jews and Baseball: An American Love Story.

Have One On Joanna Newsom At The Fox

What’s new with Joanna Newsom? A hotly anticipated show, certainly, with a full-blown band at the Fox Theater on Aug. 2. But what else has changed since I first met Joanna Newsom, back in 2003?

Back then she was playing with then-boyfriend Noah Georgeson -- the prettying keyboard-pounding support in his Strokes-y new-rock combo the Pleased.

The Week in Local Music News

Butterfly Bones, Still Flyin', Social Studies and more scheduled to appear at the 3rd annual Rock Make Street Festival [via Rock Make]

Oakland beatmakers Elephant and Castle get some props fro Pitchfork [via Pitchfork]

Kings of Leon, Gogol Bordello Anticipate Wine Teeth at Outside Lands

We just got off an Outside Lands press conference call with Kings of Leon singer Nathan Followill, Eugene Hutz of Gogol Bordello and Scott Youklis, head chef at Maverick. They're just excited as we are to eat our hearts out and listen to the good tunes coming our way August 14th and 15th.

ODC's Summer Dance Sampler

If you’re feeling the overwhelming urge to feast your eyes on modern dance and your teeth on bites of salmon (um, no promises on the salmon, the press release didn’t include a menu), head to the Mission for tapas, ODC-style.

 

'Dinner for Schmucks' Leaves Sour Aftertaste

What a disheartening spectacle we have in Dinner for Schmucks, the latest comedy since April’s Date Night to squander Steve Carell’s impeccable timing and frantic, Clouseau-like cluelessness.

For better and more often worse, we see in Barry, his latest on-screen buffoon, a character reminiscent of Michael Scott, the deluded desk jockey he plays on NBC’s The Office. Nearly paralyzed by his own stupidity, hopelessly oblivious in every aspect of his modest existence, Barry is a tragic figure, in part because of the pain behind his manic grin, and in part because he’s so easy to despise.

Daily Newsletters

Essential SF knowledge in your inbox

Subscribe to 7x7
Renew
Give a Gift
FAQ's