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Robin Rinaldi

Chef Marcus Samuelsson's Hot Hot Heat

Marcus Samuelsson, the wunderkind chef from NYC's Aquavit and award-winning cookbook author, was in SF last night to promote BlueStar ranges, powerful (and expensive) gas stoves that put out 22,000 BTUs of restaurant-level heat. Turns out Samuelsson himself owns a BlueStar and moonlights as a spokesman of sorts. We thought we'd be sitting down to a Samuelsson-prepared dinner, but instead got a cooking lesson in which he demonstrated the fine art of searing and sitr-frying, which, he repeated several times, is not the same as sauteeing. And if you're trying to sear something with a regular at-home stove, it's likely you're just sauteeing it instead.

We Got Game (On Our Plates, That Is)


Game on the rotisserie at Poggio.

What to Eat at Bay to Breakers

We're San Franciscans through and through, so we hate to say anything against Bay to Breakers, but the snacks at Footstock are not the tastiest morsels to treat yourself to after running or walking seven miles. (You thought we were gonna rant on the saggy naked people, didn't you? Nope, we've got priorities.) So whether you're in the race or just watching it, here are some things you might want to eat and drink along the route, beginning down in SoMa at the starting line:

Best-O-Burger Opens

The newest lunchtime rage downtown is Best-O-Burger, a kind of little urban version of In-N-Out on none other than Belden Lane: Angus beef, cast-iron skillets, fresh-baked buns, housemade fries (and onion rings), plus a few extras like daily-made gelato and gelato shakes. The tidy red and yellow space opened on the corner of Pine and Belden on Monday, and by Thursday the line was snaking out the door for four hours straight, from 10:30 a.m. till 2:30 p.m.


Cherries and Lunch at Bushi-Tei

In our Luxury issue, due to hit newsstands any minute now, we celebrate the long-lost art of lunch. You remember lunch—that mid-day break that civilized people used to take to eat, drink and refresh their minds before heading into the afternoon. Just in time for its return, Japantown's Bushi-Tei began serving lunch two weeks ago.

Joey Altman's Matzo Ball Soup

Just in time for Passover (which begins this Saturday at sundown), we bring you a simple and trustworthy recipe for matzo ball soup from SF's own Joey Altman, from his new cookbook Without Reservations: How to Make Bold, Creative, Flavorful Food at Home (Wiley).

Note: Schmaltz is rendered chicken fat. You can get it from some kosher grocers, from Boulettes Larder in the Ferry Building, or you can render it yourself by simply making homemade chicken soup and scooping the solid fat off the top after refrigerating it. The broth and shredded chicken would both come in handy for this recipe too. But if it's all too much trouble, Altman recommends vegetable oil as a substitute.

Thorough Bread and Pastry

Last week, the former Just Desserts space on Church Street near Market became home to Thorough Bread and Pastry (248 Church St., 415-558-0690), an artisan bakery operated by the San Francisco Baking Institute, where its students get a taste of experience while the rest of us get a taste of heaven.


Candybar Opens in NoPa

The preview of Candybar earlier this week proves that there are still original eat-and-drink concepts waiting to be explored. We have dessert destinations and wine bars, and now we have a dessert+wine bar in which the desserts arrive in bite-sized nuggets (courtesy of pastry chef Jake Godby of Coi and Fifth Floor).

"Simply Organic" Cooking

We got a copy of Simply Organic (Chronicle Books) here in the 7x7 office this week. Written by Jesse Ziff Cool, a longtime local-and-sustainable advocate who owns three organic restaurants down in Palo Alto, it’s a hefty cookbook loaded with semi-glossy pages and gorgeous photographs by SF’s own France Ruffenach.

Orson Unveiled


  
The crowd at Orson's circular marble bar.
All photos by Josh Reiss.


Elizabeth Falkner of Citizen Cake fame premiered her newest enterprise, Orson, this week in SoMa. All the prerequisites were in place: the line sprawling down Fourth Street, the large doorman, the chocolate-smeared nude waitresses, the usual crowd of power lesbians and prowling thirty-somethings thronging through the lofty space.

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