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Sarah Sung

Viva Healthy Alcohol!


Dried açaí, Milk of Millennia and VeeV neat

If you haven’t heard about açaí, it’s likely you’ve been living under a rock. After all, Oprah named it her #1 superfood, Dr. Perricone proclaims its anti-aging properties and The Washington Post deemed it “the new pomegranate.” Back in my ultra-healthy days, you’d catch me making smoothies with açaí; these days I’m more likely to be drinking cocktails with it—I’m banking on the hope that the antioxidant punch is still potent in its liquored-up form.

Pauline’s, Wine and Art

Last Friday, my friend Arnold and I practically used up all of our minutes on the phone trying to decide where to eat dinner. We didn’t want to spend a lot of money, or get dressed up, and we wanted something yummy and relatively healthy, so we agreed on Pauline’s Pizza—their salads and pizza toppings are the freshest around, the dough for the thin-crust pizza is handmade daily and their wines are a steal.


These obviously aren't from Pauline's—I forgot my camera

Red Bubbly



If you haven’t had sparkling Shiraz yet, you’re missing out. I just had my first taste in July at a Rye mix-off competition, second yesterday with Mr. Hardy himself and might just swing by the Jug Shop tonight to pick up a bottle.

Hardy Family Shiraz

A few weeks ago, I attended the Family Winemakers of California tasting event at Fort Mason, where hundreds of small, family-owned wineries were pouring their wines. I kept asking one question: How is the family involved? Growing up watching Falcon Crest, I’m guilty of romanticizing the lifestyles of families who own vineyards—you mean they all don’t have chauffeurs and lounge by the pool all day? 

Saving the World

What does sustainability mean to you?

That was the question posed to these panelists on Sunday morning at the Gastronomy by the Bay roundtable entitled Organic Farming and the Food Chain.


Sustainability panel

Organic farmer, Andy Griffin, Mariquita Farm
Organic winery owner Julie Johnson, Tres Sabores Winery (organic since 1990) Julie Johnson

Gastronomy by the Bay

I worked over Labor Day Weekend, but when work requires that one eat and drink and be merry, the line gets blurry.


Cooking demos outside the Ferry Building Marketplace

This weekend was the Gastronomy by the Bay event—the first international culinary event that brings together chefs and press from North America and Europe. I attended two of the three roundtables—one on sustainability, organic farming and the food chain and the other on gastronomic guides and the Internet.

Vacation Hangover

As hangovers go, it’s my opinion that the worst kind is not from Champagne or tequila, but rather from vacation. Even if you enjoy your everyday life and your work is your passion, the transition from all things new and exciting back to the same old (albeit good) thing takes some adjustment.

Like an alcohol-related hangover, the best cure is the hair of the dog—in this case, more traveling. Since most of us can’t ask our bosses for time off right after returning, the next best alternative is to treat yourself to your favorite vacation-like activities in your own hometown. The best thing about doing this is that you know all the good spots to hit.

A Shower and a Beer

After the El Tesoro tequila anniversary party and the Family Winemakers tasting, my poor liver was more than ready for some serious detox; but the beer-drinking gods, however, had different plans.


Huckleberry Country



It’s no secret that I’m a berry gal—strawberries first, then blueberries, with raspberries and blackberries tying for third. So when I was in Montana last week and saw roadside signs for huckleberry everything—ice cream, pie, pancakes, jam, beer, you name it—I knew I had to try some. Of course, we were in Montana to go backpacking and camping in Glacier National Park, not to go on one of my food-focused benders, so I was more than willing to let the berry thing go. But as it turns out, huckleberry eating was in the cards.

Dine for a Cause


Machu Picchu
photography by Rachel Berg

We San Franciscans are all too familiar with earthquakes. I don’t know about you, but I’ve been following the news about Peru’s 7.9er last week. Recent reports put the death toll at more than 500, with tens of thousands victims left homeless. Tragedies like this often make me feel helpless—what can I do to help people thousands of miles away?
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