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Fantasy Restaurants: Readers' Dreams for SF

I called a friend of mine yesterday and caught him in the middle of making his fantasy football picks. I'm not much for football, but I didn't want to be left out of the fun—so when I got back to my desk I tweeted the following: "If you could snap your fingers and your dream restaurant would be created here in SF, what would it be? Please don't say pizzeria." (By the way, if you're not following our food Twitter feed @7x7bitsbites you are missing some wild times). The imagining of a fantasy San Francisco restaurant is one of my favorite hobbies. I even have a post-it on my computer screen on which I've written (and circled) "The Restaurant of Our Dreams". What would it be? I have some thoughts, but I was pleased to see that many of you like to play my game.

So what do you want (restauranteurs, you can give me a cut of the profits in a few years when you open one of these places and the crowd goes wild)? There were calls for more Greek food and for gluten-free restaurants and a demand for a few more In-N-Outs. Someone rightly noted that we could stand to get an Armenian restaurant (for that you have to go to LA), another tweeter said they'd like vegetarian Tex-Mex and one reader opined that they'd love to see a BBQ joint that did English breakfast replete with baked beans and sausage. Jason Rose, kitchen director at La Cocina, said he'd like to see a motorcycle-themed American diner where classics—burgers, fried chicken and "big, fat, delicious pies" were executed to perfection. For David Bazirgan, chef of Chez Papa Resto, his dream restaurant is a 40 seat French restaurant with a full liquor license, hand-written tasting menus daily, a vegetable garden, a patio and a lounge with a fireplace. (Sounds like he's given this some thought).

What else do you want? Taiwanese pork buns, a late-night buffet-style dessert restaurant and healthy Indian food. And some of you were very specific in what you'd like to see: "A replica of NYC's charming and teeny and perfect Prune restaurant." (I enthusiastically agree. Can you imagine if we had a restaurant where we could eat sardines and Triscuits at the bar?) But perhaps my favorite of all the responses came from my friend Francis Lam, a New Yorker and a frequent contributor to Gourmet magazine. He tweeted a response: "How about a pizza-burger-bacon street cart with cocktails and bacon and pork and bacon? Preferably with a hipster beard." Oh Mr. Lam, you think you know us so well...