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Eat + Drink

The Atlantic Takes A Restaurant Roadtrip

Writer Terrence Henry, retired early only to go on an eating tour for three months—from Argentina to Italy—and write about it for The Atlantic. Upon his return to the US, he discovered that, "Hidden restaurants, innovative farmers, culinary craftsmen—our nation's love affair with food was continuing to grow and evolve, in spite of a financial crisis thinning the country's pockets and a food system that seems determined to exchange quality and safety for efficiency and profit."

Today's Hot Links: Where The Cows Don't Roam, Plus Jesus Juice

Humphry Slocombe debuts their newest flavor, a coke-cotes du rhone hybrid aptly titled “Jesus Juice.” Now that’s going to get some people fired up.

Is is an apricot? Is it a plum? No, fools, it’s an aprium.

Read it and weep (literally): a heartbreaking story about dairy farms in California.

A how-to guide to opening your own dive bar.

Cheap Wine Wars: The Two Buck Chuckwagon Heads South

In news that is positively dripping with irony on many, many fronts, Two Buck Chuck—the unbelievably cheap wine that turned the American wine market on its head a few years ago—is going on the road. To of all places . . . Australia.

114 Reasons To Eat At Lers Ros

When not one but two of my most trusted food loving colleagues mentioned Lers Ros to me a few weeks back, I made a mental note. The nine-month old restaurant was lavishly praised by Patricia Unterman just before Christmas, then written about again in the SF Weekly in late March. So that means I'm a little late coming to the party, but also that chances are good that despite all the attention this little Tenderloin Thai restaurant has received, you may still have never heard of it.

A Punch-Drunk Fourth: Not Just for Old People

There's no better way to serve a crowd than a punch. It might take a little preparation, but so does potato salad. And once you've got it all together, you can just sit back and enjoy the day. Here's an adaptation of one of my favorite recipes—a classic, going back to the golden age of punch in the 18th century England (no, the woman in the photo is not from the 18th century, although she could be), when tea and rum were prized commodities for the seafaring nation.

Regent's Punch
Serves about 16.

4 lemons
6 oranges
2 limes
4 bags of green tea or 4 teaspoons green tea leaves
1 cup superfine sugar
2 cups brandy, try VSOP cognac
3/4 cup dark rum
1/2 cup light rum or cachaca

Lowering the Bar: 5 Places to Drink for Cheap (or Free) This Week

Each week, former sf.myopenbar.com editor Allie Pape brings you her picks for the best places to booze on the cheap in SF. Have an event coming up? Want to share a great tip? E-mail her.

Market Watch: Thursday Now Means Tacos, Wood-Fired Pizza and More

Lunch is served! This week marks the return of the new and improved Thursday Ferry Plaza Farmers Market, with more food fixings than ever: wood-fired pizza from Pizza Politana, porchetta sandwiches for Roli Roti, tacos and homemade strawberry horchata from Tacolicious, the latest from the Laiola team, lox sandwiches from Cap’n Mike’s Holy Smoke and kimchi okonomiyaki from the folks behind Namu. Additionally, you can find the best seasonal produce from Dirty Girl, Tory Farms, Lucero, Swanton and Lagier Ranches.

First Bite: Plant Cafe Offers Waterfront Views and the Promise of Organic

Last night's opening of The Plant Café on the Embarcadero—the second location of what was formerly called Lettüs Café in the Marina—marked the dawn of a mini organic empire for owners Matthew Guelke and Mark Lewis. Softly lit by dozens of Edison bulb pendants, the restaurant catered to stylish couples and eco-moms, enjoying a peak at the historic shipping station resuscitated by architect Cass Calder Smith—who also designed the nearby La Mar Cebicheria.

A Down-and-Dirty, Last-Minute Fourth of July BBQ

The situation: Since your house has a view, your friends have elected you to be the host of the fireworks party.

The problem: You haven't had time to even think about what to cook.

The solution: A menu of grilled sausages with spicy mustard, German potato salad, fruit kabobs and chilled raspberry cream pie.

Rosamunde Sausage Grill (545 Haight St., 415-437-6851) doesn't just make the best sausages in SF, they sell them uncooked too. Our perennial favorite is the spicy beer sausage. Pick up as many as you need ($3 a sausage) and while you're at it, add in some of their great potato salad to-go.

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