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Eat + Drink

Serve Crab for Thanksgiving

Every year here, the beginning of Dungeness crab season and Thanksgiving collide, making crab for Turkey Day a great SF tradition. Friday was the beginning of the crab season here, so to celebrate, Joe went down to Clement Street and bought six hefty—very feisty—live crabs and brought them home, stuffed in his messenger bag, to cook for an impromptu dinner party.

Thanksgiving Dinner in SF: How to get and give

Thanksgiving is now only 11 days away, which means that you should either be a) furiously collecting recipes (look for some from us later this week or b) furiously dialing for a Thankgiving day reservation. Our friends over at Chow have already done us the favor of compiling a list of some of the best places to tuck in to turkey; click here to see their list. Or, for a complete list of places throughout the Bay Area that are serving (and to make reservations), check out the Opentable round-up here.

We’d like to add a few they left off:

Sunday Suppers in SF

You want to have the best experience at a restaurant in San Francisco? Don’t go on a Friday or Saturday. Really. Because you know what? Those are the same nights that everyone wants to dine out, and the crush of humanity would really like to be seated at 7:30, thank you very much. Valentine’s Day is often referred to by the industry as “amateur night” and I’m betting Friday and Saturdays are considered “amateurish” too.

Spanish Coffee Recipe from Absinthe

This hot drink from Absinthe is a pyrotechnic showstopper. Serves 1

Sugar for coating rim of glass
1 ounce 151-proof rum
ground cinnamon (preferably in a shakable container)
4 ounces hot coffee
1/2 ounce Kahlúa
1/2 ounce brandy
whipped cream

Coat the rim of a wineglass with sugar, and pour the rum into the glass. Using a lighter, ignite the rum. Being careful not to tip the rim of the glass toward the ground, twist the glass in your fingers and sprinkle the fire with cinnamon. (Be careful: This will generate some large bursts of fire!) When sugar is caramelized around the rim of the glass, put the fire out by pouring coffee into the glass. Finish with Kahlúa and brandy, and top with whipped cream.

Eater's Deathwatch is Dead (for now)

I’m a fan of Eater—for the record, I often find it’ssnarky-lite tone quite entertaining (I’m sure I will retract this when Paolo,the editor, starts poking fun at my overuse of the phrase “for the record” likehe did with SF Weekly’s Merideth Brody’s “enticing”—butI’ve never been a fan of their Deathwatch column, which encourages readers tonominate restaurants they deem doomed. They’ve put Avenue G, Yoshi’s and Senson this watch.

 

86 the Tomatoes: Are We Seasonal or Narrow-Minded?

Seasonality. It’s is a word bandied about a lot here. “Our menu is seasonally driven …” How many times have you heard a chef say that?

A lot.

For some reason, tomatoes are the most seasonally sacred of all vegetables and fruits: Should an unwitting chef serve a tomato in January, I guarantee the Chowhounders will log on to vent about the sacrilege. While the average diner might be vague on the seasonality of an artichoke (it has two seasons here: spring and fall) and have no guilt about munching on green beans year-round, everyone knows that a slice of tomato=a slice of summer. (And, for the record, summer ended September 21st.)

Not surprisingly then, last week I went to order a sandwich from The Sentinel, chef Dennis Leary’s tiny sandwich shop, and noticed the note: “No more tomatoes until next summer—sorry.” Then Jessica told me that she was at Tartine and ordered an open-faced sandwich that was listed as having tomatoes on it—only to be told that tomatoes would no longer be served with it because tomatoes are out of season.

Tartine's Heavenly Morning Buns Recipe

Lovers of Tartine’s legendary morning buns have noticed the recipe’s absence from the pages of the bakery’s cookbook, Tartine (Chronicle Books), published last August. “We didn’t do it on purpose,” says co-owner Elisabeth Prueitt, who’s been surprised at the number of calls and emails she’s had from people requesting it. Although she plans to put the recipe on Tartine’s own website soon, for immediate sweet-tooth satisfaction, we've got the recipe right here.

Tartine 600 Guerrero St., 415-487-2600

Omnivore: Books on Food



As they say: Don’t judge a dog walker by its cover … or something like that.

Celia Sack, whose identity for the past 10 years has been as co-owner of the Noe Valley Pet Co., is pretty much the last person you’d think would make the leap from selling Nyla bones to antiquated cookbooks. On November 8th, she's opening Omnivore: Books on Food, located just around the corner from the Pet Co. on Cesar Chavez in a former butcher shop. (When she told me this I had a butcher shop déjà vu—like everything these days is being opened in a former butcher shop—call me crazy.) You also might not assume that Sack has a library of 5,000 books stored in the Castro District home that she shares with her partner Paula Harris (the other owner of the Pet Co.). Formerly a rare book specialist at Pacific Book Auction Galleries, Sack will be carrying hundreds of books—both brand, spanking new and very, very old—on everything from raising pigs to cooking pork.

This is such an obvious fit for SF.
There so many great cookbook stores around the country but none here. I love to cook and my collecting interest has always been food books, particularly ‘Victorian era professional’—they’re not cookbooks, they’re more about how to set up a pastry shop and display your popular penny cakes in a display. For some reason that’s fascinating to me.

Order Your (Heritage) Turkey Now

A few weeks ago I went to Traci Des Jardins' Acme Chophouse to taste the season's best sustainable meat and game in preparation for the holidays. Traci and executive chef Thom Fox were joined by the owners of Sonoma Country Poultry and Marin Sun Farms to talk about their turkeys, duck, geese, cows, goats, lambs, pigs and chickens. Bottom line: "The better the animals are treated, the better the meat tastes," according to Marin Sun Farms' Judie Geise.

 

The Best Sushi in San Francisco

I know how this will sound, but it’s true—I read Details for the articles. I don’t always agree with their take on food in San Francisco, but it’s always interesting to see what the editors have to say. However, this story, about the best sushi joints in America, got it exactly right, naming some of my favorite places.

 

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