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Eat + Drink

Stable Cafe turns two (weeks) tomorrow!

I don't know about the rest of you, but I've finally reached the age where I can't open my inbox without receiving a birth announcement, baby shower invitation, or photograph of a pink newborn. These are the same people whose weddings I attended about three years back, so it shouldn't come as such a surprise. Yet it does, every time.

 
Stable Cafe turns two weeks old tomorrow.

Dosa on Fillmore: Opening Soon


Anjan and Emily Mitra in their first days at Dosa
in the Mission.


Anjan Mitra, co-owner (with his wife Emily) of Dosa, is gearing up to launch Dosa on Fillmore. Located on the corner of Post Street, in the old Goodwill space right across from the Sundance Kabuki theater, it promises to add a good bit of spice to that part of town. The new Dosa will be open until midnight and serve lunch and a weekend brunch too. We’re looking forward following up our next Fillmore concert, movie-night-out or post-Kabuki Springs soak with a little South Indian fix. Anjan gave us the latest.

Mayacoba Bean Salad with Pesto and Shrimp from Steve Sando's Heirloom Beans

Even if you don't know Steve Sando by name, you're probably familiar with his heirloom beans, which he grows on his farm in Napa, Rancho Gordo, and sells at the Saturday farmers market at the Ferry Building. His new cookbook, written with co-author Vanessa Barrington, is chock-a-block full of delicious-sounding recipes, from spring lamb with flageolets to Anasazi cowboy chili. If you can't make it to the farmers market, you can also find Rancho Gordo beans in the bulk bins at Rainbow Grocery. If your experience with beans is limited to the canned variety, you're in for a treat. Sando's varieties (with such fun names as Marrow Beans, Black Valentine and Appaloosa) are toothsome and tasty.

Mayacoba Bean Salad with Pesto and Shrimp

OPEN City at New Langton Arts

Even in my jaded moments (like, say, when we’re in the throes of shipping our October issue and are wondering why on earth we decided to put so many goddamn words in each story), I realize I live in a pretty unique food town. And not simply because we have such good raw product to work with and so many talented chefs and great restaurants, but also because we live in a town where people are willing to take chances.


In-town turkeys: potential ingredients for OPEN City?

The Eat + Drink List: This week's top 7



1. Chocolate Coma

City Bites at Macy's

As we assemble our weekly eat + drink events e-newsletter (Sent to your inbox every Wednesday! Chock-a-block full of useful information! To sign up, enter your email address on our homepage!) there is always an event or two that we can’t squeeze in but that you certainly shouldn’t miss. This fall, there’s a whole series of events, called City Bites, happening in the Cellar at Macy’s, and the series kicks off this Wednesday with an event all about honey.


Who are you calling honey, sweetheart? Scott, Mayclem and Werner together at Macy's

Humphry Slocombe: Ice Cream for Adults

If just for the name, I’ll be stopping by Humphry Slocombe, the latest ice cream shop to hit the Mission, slated to open a few weeks from now. (If this weather continues I’d advise lining up starting right now at 2790 Harrison at 24th Street.) The brainchild of Jake Godby, the opening pastry chef at Coi (who also spent time in the kitchens of Boulevard, Fifth Floor and the defunct Tartare), Humphry has no designs on being the ice cream-for-everyone shop (witness flavors such as salted licorice, salt-and-pepper and sweet corn-and-blackberry). Godby gave us the scoop.

How did you come up with the name?

Branch Out With Your Sauvignon Blanc

When it comes to Sauvignon Blanc, people think of New Zealand, the Loire Valley and even California. But few remember to think of Bordeaux, whose white wines are not seen in big numbers. Yet they are composed in part of Sauvignon Blanc and often have a tinge of that bracing green herbalness that fans of the grape love. The other part of the wine, often the majority, is made up of Semillon, a grape with a bigger, rounder body and texture than SB and less-green, more-honeyed notes.

Japanese Beer: Rice Isn't Only for Sake

I found this interesting Japanese beer on the shelf in Whole Foods. The label, a watercolor of people working the rice paddy, was enticing. It's also a good indication of the beer, which is made from rice. Koshihikari is, according to Wikipedia, a popular rice strain in Japan. The beer is indicative of its origins. It's light in body, texture and flavor. If it's hopped, it's only gently, as there's just a slight grainy whiff of citrus to the beer. It will be too light for most American drinkers, but with some delicate sashimi, it would be lovely.
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