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Eat + Drink

Planting a Victory Garden

Sure, there are plenty of questionable projects funded by the City of San Francisco, but here’s one worth taking note of (and action on): The SF Victory Gardens program, a pilot program aimed to support the transition of backyard, front yard, window boxes, rooftops and unused land into organic food production areas. In other words, city-dwellers, here is your opportunity to turn your underutilized space into a green oasis, with support from a team of talented professionals.


This could be your backyard.
Photograph by Chris Beddoe.

The Eat + Drink List: This Week's Top 7



1. Got game?

From tonight through May 3, chef Peter McNee of Poggio will be showcasing one of his favorite cooking techniques: allo spiedo, or roasting on a spit. For a very reasonable $19, diners can sample featured roasts, ranging from partridge and pheasant to goat and suckling pig. McNee has also designed a separate menu inspired by spring in Italy.



2. Get the edge on veggies

The End of an Era for Frisson

If you’ve been following the restaurant gossip these last few months then you’ve likely heard about Frisson. The restaurant closed a few months ago, ostensibly for a redesign, and partners Joe Hargrave and Andrew McCormack (who also own Laiola) teamed up with Myth chef Sean O’Brien, with grand plans for a redesign and relaunch. Meanwhile, Frisson’s former chef Sarah Schafer scooted across town to head up the kitchen at the newly opened Anchor & Hope.

Kid-Friendly Dining: The Dilemma

Here’s my dilemma: As a parent, I want my kids to experience all sorts of food at all sorts of restaurants—taquerias to ramen joints to the likes of Zuni. Sure, it would be easier to stay at home and eat Annie’s, but what’s the point of living in SF if they don’t get a taste of it? (Admittedly, I have visions of them growing up worldly and cool, telling tales of their groovy, urban mom who took them out on the town and now they appreciate everything from kim chee to menudo to croquettes because of it. Thanks, Mom. We’re forever indebted to you.)

Wine Tech: The Final Frontier



This new invention might just have legs . . .

El Cachanilla: The Perfect Tacos

I had a Technicolor food moment the other day: Running errands last weekend, on an intensely bright and beautiful Sunday, I pulled over at 21st and Treat to get a little lunch at El Cachanilla, the only taqueria in SF that transports me immediately to Mexico. The tacos are small in true antojito style, and served from a little window where your choices of meat are displayed in scratchy handwriting—in both Spanish and English. I conservatively ordered three carnitas tacos, but the sign says they offer everything from tripe to eye, neither of which have I tested out. I’m relatively hardcore, but not hardcore enough for eye taco.

Cherries and Lunch at Bushi-Tei

In our Luxury issue, due to hit newsstands any minute now, we celebrate the long-lost art of lunch. You remember lunch—that mid-day break that civilized people used to take to eat, drink and refresh their minds before heading into the afternoon. Just in time for its return, Japantown's Bushi-Tei began serving lunch two weeks ago.

Green is Good

In this age of rampant greenwashing, it’s hard to know what to believe. Everywhere you turn someone has an eco, organic, sustainable party line—how can you tell the fakers from the real deal? But there’s one business in San Francisco that setting the standard for green business, and proving that it’s possible to be both successful and conscientious: Mixt Greens.


Dear Mixt Greens,
Thanks for not trashing the planet while
making us lunch. Love, us.
Courtesy of Mixt Greens.

The Eat + Drink List: This Week's Top 7

1. The family that works together, eats together

Biodynamic Wines: For Earth Day (and Beyond...)

Apropos of Earth Day (my wedding anniversary, BTW), let's talk about the growing movement toward organics and, especially, biodynamics in wine production. Many wine producers think biodynamics is a load of mystical hooey, but it's hard to argue with the satisfaction that so many producers have gained by converting all or some of their vineyard land to this kind of farming. It's also hard to argue against it when some of the most august estates in France--DRC, Domaine Leroy, M. Chapoutier--are doing it, not to mention top California producers like Araujo, Benziger and Robert Sinskey.
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