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acme chophouse

Extreme Restaurant Makeovers: The Recession's Blessing

I started writing about SF’s food scene during the height of the dot-com boom, but that means I also saw it through the bust, when South of Market looked like a ghost town and restaurants like Azie, which really represented that era to me (cutting-edge $30-plus entrees) closed, and not surprisingly.

Still, I’ve witnessed nothing ravage the city’s restaurant landscape like this current recession. It’s been like a wild fire. But right now, I’m happy to report that there’s new growth: The wildflowers are emerging from the forest floor. (Nothing a writer likes more than an extended metaphor.)

The Year In Review: Food Trends of 2009

Oh 2009, we hardly knew ye. But now with (gulp) exactly two weeks left in this year and this decade, it's time to look at the food trends of 2009.

2009 Burger Bonanza: Acme's Classic

Welcome to the 2009 Burger Bonanza wherein two girls eat 20 of the city's best burgers, on the path to burger enlightenment. The 10 best will then be chosen to be featured—in ranking order—in 7x7's September magazine issue. Burgers must fit our "fancy burger" parameter: made with beef and available as part of the regular dinner menu at upscale restaurants in SF. Beyond that, we're open to suggestions, which we hope you will leave in the comment box below!

ACME CHOPHOUSE

Chopped: What's a Critic's Responsibilty?

Michael Bauer pretty much took Acme Chophouse to the killing floor today. The last time he reviewed Acme was in 2002, seven years ago. And in one fell swoop he's lowered it's star rating from 2 1/2 to one (giving the food half a star) with a blunt headline for those readers that do nothing more than skim boldface: "Acme Chophouse Strikes Out at the Ballpark."

Order Your (Heritage) Turkey Now

A few weeks ago I went to Traci Des Jardins' Acme Chophouse to taste the season's best sustainable meat and game in preparation for the holidays. Traci and executive chef Thom Fox were joined by the owners of Sonoma Country Poultry and Marin Sun Farms to talk about their turkeys, duck, geese, cows, goats, lambs, pigs and chickens. Bottom line: "The better the animals are treated, the better the meat tastes," according to Marin Sun Farms' Judie Geise.

 

Alice Waters Can Feed 20 People With 2 Cauliflowers?

While we’re used to hearing dreamy, Californiafied quips from Alice Waters, in NYC, they don’t even know what to do with it. A week ago she was at the Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival where she spoke on “A New Agenda: Food” with New York Times Magazine editor Gerry Mazorati. According to WWD, which excerpted some of the conversation (which I found by way of the always resourceful Eater), Waters—when asked about the elitism associated with foodies—said:

“I bought two cauliflowers at the farmers’ market today. It cost me $4.20. I could have fed 10 to 20 people with them. You just need to know how to cook.”

Taking this into consideration, I called up a few people that know how to cook to ask their opinion. Although more than one alluded to the fact that the idea of feeding 20 people with two (hopefully large) heads of cauliflower might be best applied in a third world country, I did get some creative—if hopeful—answers.
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