Skip to Navigation Skip to Content

Alec Baldwin

George Romero Returns to His Zombie Roots with ‘Survival of the Dead’

Let’s get one thing straight: George Romero, the legendary director of Night of the Living Dead whose nightmarish vision of zombies rising from the grave to prey upon the living has spawned countless imitations and remakes, never wanted to take a break from the franchise that has become his most celebrated legacy.

“After I made Monkey Shines in 1988, I started developing a bunch of big movies for Hollywood studios, projects like Goosebumps and The Mummy, and I made more money then than I ever have before or since,” says Romero, 70. “We were rewriting movies for big stars – you know, let’s make this for Sharon Stone or Alec Baldwin. Then the next week, we’d be rewriting the same movie again for Eddie Murphy.

Home Movies: ‘It’s Complicated’ Arrives on DVD, Blanchett’s ‘Elizabeth’ Rises Again

“If you want to have your situation fixed, you have to start dating,” a girlfriend tells Jane, setting the mechanics of her story in motion. “Anyone!”

Jane is a frustrated divorcée, played by the incomparable Meryl Streep, who warily watches her cheating ex Jake (Alec Baldwin) make off with his much-younger mistress turned wife (Lake Bell) as if going through some stereotypical midlife crisis. There’s still a spark between them – a family reunion leads them back to the bedroom after 10 years of separation – but is Jake still the one?

Notes From a Darkened Theater: Corey Haim, of ‘Lucas’ and ‘The Lost Boys,’ Dead at 38

Corey Haim, who starred in popular teen comedies including Lucas (1986), License to Drive (1988) and Dream a Little Dream (1989), as well as Joel Schumacher’s 1987 cult hit The Lost Boys, has died at 38 of what is believed to be an accidental drug overdose.

Notes from a Darkened Theater: Frameline Winners Announced, Brüno Under Fire, More Moneyball

With festival attendance topping 60,000 and ticket sales up from the last two years despite a sluggish economy, Frameline 33, the oldest and largest celebration of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender films and filmmakers in the world, reached its conclusion Sunday with the world premiere of Wendy Jo Carlton’s Hannah Free. Now, there’s only one thing left to do: announce the winners.

Daily Newsletters

Essential SF knowledge in your inbox

Subscribe to 7x7
Renew
Give a Gift
FAQ's