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Allen Ginsberg

Palo Alto's James Franco on Creating Cinematic Poetry as Ginsberg in 'Howl'

When Bob Rosenthal, executor of Allen Ginsberg’s estate, first approached filmmakers Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman in 2005, asking them to do the seemingly impossible – adapt Ginsberg’s 1956 epic poem Howl for a movie – they immediately accepted his challenge. But how to do it?
 
“There was no way we were going to make the 50th anniversary, but we made the 55th,” says Friedman, 59. He and Epstein, an Oscar-winner for 1984’s The Times of Harvey Milk, had previously directed The Celluloid Closet, a 1995 documentary chronicling the history of gays in cinema.

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

The second Oakland Underground Film Festival kicks off tonight at the historic Grand Lake Theater with South by Southwest Film Festival favorite Thunder Soul, about the charismatic band leader who turned an inner-city Houston high school's jazz band into a powerful funk outfit, and American Grindhouse, a revealing documentary about cheerfully trashy exploitation cinema. Elsewhere:

Behind the Scenes of Howl with Eric Drooker

If you haven’t already heard about Howl, listen up. Directors Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman have just finished a movie version of Allen Ginsberg’s famously epic poem. The movie, part live action drama—starring James Franco, Jon Hamm and Mary-Louise Parker—and part animation hits theaters September 24 and is going to be big. Simultaneously, Harper Collins is publishing a graphic novel of renowned artist Eric Drooker’s animation from the film. We had the honor of sitting down with the painter, New Yorker cover illustrator and Berkeley resident to learn more about this gargantuan project.
 

James Franco Takes on Allen Ginsberg’s ‘Howl’ to Close LGBT Film Festival Tonight at the Castro

Oscar-winning documentarians Rob Epstein (The Times of Harvey Milk) and Jeffrey Friedman (Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt) celebrate the life and poetry of Allen Ginsberg with their most audacious undertaking to date: Howl, a rousing, almost hallucinatory cinematic interpretation of the author's most famous work and an effective re-enactment of the 1957 obscenity trial, held in San Francisco, that made it famous.

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

Not wanting to boldly go where millions are already planning to be this weekend? (Hint: We're not talking about Ben Vereen's Saturday night gig at Hotel Nikko.) If so, there are plenty of alternatives to space-based fantasy awaiting you at the city's indie theaters.

1. Sita Sings the Blues
Where: Red Vic Movie House, 1727 Haight St., 415-668-3994
When: May 8-12

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