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bob dylan

Michael Rapaport, Phife Dawg Explore 'Beats Rhymes & Life' and the Tumultuous Travels of A Tribe Called Quest

In an industry dominated by larger-than-life personalities, sometimes with egos to match, even a touch of false modesty is refreshing. But for first-time feature director Michael Rapaport, better known for his acting turns in True Romance (1993) and TV’s Boston Public, humility is no act.
 
After a decade spent seeking the right opportunity to get behind the camera, the native New Yorker, a self-proclaimed “hard-core fan” of the seminal hip-hop trio (and sometime quartet) A Tribe Called Quest, saw the stars align in 2008, when Tribe reunited for an abbreviated summer tour.
 

Nubile Inmates Take Back the Asylum in Zack Snyder's Stylish 'Sucker Punch'

Having joined the ranks of today’s most promising young directors after first crafting music videos for Morrissey and Dionne Farris, Zack Snyder has skillfully married his passion for song with his inclination to grandiose cinema.
 
Whether thrusting us into a world on the brink of apocalypse against the haunting strains of Johnny Cash’s “The Man Comes Around” in Dawn of the Dead (2004), or opening his adaptation of Alan Moore’s Watchmen (2009) with a condensed century of superhero history backed by Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are a-Changin’,” Snyder has a Midas touch in the soundtrack department.
 

How Dylan and the Dead Rescued 'The Music Never Stopped' from Desolation Row

When he appeared before the U.S. Senate in 1991, nine years before joining the board of directors of the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function, Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart spoke of the healing power of music, and how it might be instrumental in restoring the morale and mental health of the aged.
 
Little did Hart know at the time that his own music, like that of ’60s contemporaries Bob Dylan, Buffalo Springfield and The Beatles, would ultimately resuscitate Jim Kohlberg’s movie The Music Never Stopped, adapted from an essay by Dr. Oliver Sacks about the power of song to help a brain-damaged amnesiac recover lost memories.
 

This Week's Hottest Events: Bob Dylan, Wallpaper and Rear Window

Music: Bob Dylan
Chances are you don't have tickets to Bob Dylan's sold-out show at the Fox tomorrow. Lucky for you, the legendary musician who single-handedly redefined song as poetry, is playing a second show at the Warfield on Wednesday, and tickets are not being sold in advance. Bring your sleeping bag, camp out at the box office on Tuesday night and come prepared with $60 cash. If you call yourself a music lover, this is your duty. $60; Wednesday, 8/25; The Warfield, 982 Market St., 800-745-3000, thewarfieldtheatre.com

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