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Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Miranda Kennedy (Sideways on a Scooter: Life and Love in India)

Thursday, July 14th, 6 pm, at Book Passage SF (1 Ferry Building)

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

San Francisco plays host to visiting authors of all stripes, not to mention a bevy of homegrown literary talent. In celebration of that, we're introducing a new weekly roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Writers with Drinks

Saturday, July 9th, 7:30-9:30 pm, at Make-Out Room (3225 22nd St.)

This monthly event brings together a diverse group of writers (including a number of out-of-towners) to read short excerpts of their work. Featured readers for the July edition include Los Angeles-based Charles Yu, poet/novelist Jesse Ball, retro career-advice guru Lynn Peril, and novelist Anna North (more on several of these authors below). Admission is a $5-10 sliding scale, and true to the event's name, drinks are available at the bar.

Free He'Brew Beer Tastings at 'Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah' Readings This Week

From latkes and hamentaschen to bagels and gefilte fish, Jewish food has become an iconic part of American culture. Jewish booze, on the other hand, has mostly been relegated to punchlines about syrupy Manischewitz. Jeremy Cowan has helped to change all that. His Shmaltz Brewing Company, founded in SF in 1996, started with only 100 cases of hand-labeled He'Brew Beer. Fifteen years later, Shmaltz sells over 100,000 cases of its kosher craft beers per year, and has supplemented He'Brew with a second line of beers, Coney Island Craft Lagers.

Author Sloane Crosley Talks Trash, TV, and Tartine

Sloane Crosley may hail from New York, but any young urbanite can empathize with her exploits. Whether she's embarking on a disastrous trip to Portugal in an attempt to be more spontaneous, trying to find the perfect apartment, or riding in a really smelly cab, Crosley projects an air of good-natured haplessness that appeals to the klutz inside all of us. Her first book of essays, I Was Told There'd Be Cake, was a New York Times bestseller and was optioned by HBO; the sequel, How Did You Get This Number, has just been released in paperback.

Our Exquisite Corpse Game Begins Today: Submit Your Drawings!

Let our Exquisite Corpse game begin! In the spirit of Chronicle Books' inspiring new tome The Exquisite Book: 100 Artists Play a Collaborative Game (a twist on the classic Exquisite Corpse game), we're challenging you to rev up those artistic engines.

Required Reading: Rodes Fishburne

After reporting on the publishing experiments turning up around San Francisco, we asked the city’s writers what they’re reading these days, and they were happy to share. Look for Required Reading every week. 

While living in a remote tent camp in Alaska, Rodes Fishburne was left stranded for 21 days after a severe storm. During that time, the San Francisco author of Going to See the Elephant read War and Peace cover to covertwice. These days, Fishburne tastes are entirely modern and tend toward much shorter reads, some just 140 characters long.

Are You SF's Next Hot Poster Artist?

We here at 7x7 found ourselves so inspired by The Exquisite Book: 100 Artists Play a Collaborative Game (Chronicle Books), that we decided to continue the game online. Starting Dec. 1, we'll post a drawing from the book done by a local artist—one each Wednesday. Get your pens and paints ready because we're asking you to "respond" to each drawing with your own creation. Every week, we'll pick our favorite drawing and give the contributor $150 in local gift certificates. Then, at the end of December, we'll choose the best from the weekly winners.

Required Reading: Sasha Wizansky

After reporting on the publishing experiments turning up around San Francisco, we asked the city’s writers what they’re reading these days, and they were happy to share. Look for Required Reading every week. 

Sasha Wizansky is a founding editor of Meatpaper, the print quarterly about all things meat and carnivorous culture. She is author of Your New Glass Eye.

Magazines: I've always been interested in periodicals, especially the quirky and independent ones, and it seems my subscription list keeps growing: CabinetEsopusBidounGastronomicaPrintDiner JournalThe BelieverMcSweeney's, and The New Yorker. My life would be pretty different if the New Yorker ceased to exist. An ideal rainy day activity is curling up on the couch with a pile of print, which, it turns out, is nowhere near dead.

Novels: I haven't really caught on to micro-blogging or other short-form communication, and too much onscreen reading makes me dizzy. A good chunky novel still has the power to seduce me, especially when it spins an old-fashioned yarn. I keep up with Jonathan Lethem's novels for his vivid and offbeat storytelling. I loved the characters and slippery satire of Chronic City.

Local Author Kelly Valen On the Twisted World of Female Friendships

“My life’s greatest sorrow stems from my inability to feel close to other women.” This is the first sentence from Piedmont author Kelly Valen’s New York Times article from which her new book The Twisted Sisterhood: Unraveling the Dark Legacy of Female Friendship stemmed.  It’s been years since the sorority experience that soured Valen on female friendships, but the pain is still fresh. A pain that Valen found she shares with many women. 

Required Reading: Mary Roach

After reporting on the publishing experiments popping up around San Francisco, we asked the city’s writers what they’re reading these days, and they were happy to share. Look for Required Reading every Tuesday.

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