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Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Lucy Knisley (Relish: My Life in the Kitchen)

Saturday, April 13, 5 pm, at Books Inc. Berkeley (1760 4th St.)

Monday, April 15, 6-7 pm, at Omnivore Books (3885a Cesar Chavez St.)

Comics artist Knisley (French Milk) has developed a cult following on the Web for her insightful examinations of twentysomething life and the process of growing up. Knisley also loves food, and she comes from a family with a culinary pedigree: her mother was a chef and her father a gourmet before either was hip, and she grew up in Manhattan restaurant kitchens before a move to upstate New York. In her new graphic memoir, she examines how food has affected her at all stages of her life, from fancy organic fare to ramen and McDonald's fries.

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Caroline Paul & Wendy MacNaughton (Lost Cat: A True Story of Love, Desperation, and GPS Technology)

Tuesday, April 9, 7:30 pm, at The Booksmith (1644 Haight St.)

SF locals Paul and MacNaughton were already struggling to help Paul deal with injuries sustained in a plane crash when their beloved cat, Tibia, went missing. After five weeks in the wilderness, Tibia suddenly and nonchalantly returned, leading the couple to wonder where he'd ventured in his time away. So they outfitted him with a GPS tracker and a cat camera, and followed him on his adventures. The result is this reflection, written by Paul and illustrated by MacNaughton, on the deep relationships we have with our pets and coming to terms with the fact that we'll never truly understand what they're thinking. 

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Ellen Sussman

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Alison Singh Gee (Where the Peacocks Sing: A Palace, A Prince, and a Search For Home)

Saturday, March 23, 1 pm, at Book Passage Corte Madera (51 Tamal Vista Blvd.)

High-flying magazine writer Gee was living the good life in Hong Kong when she fell hard for Ajay, a charming fellow journalist. He also had a unique secret: In his small Indian village, Ajay was actually a prince, and he still hoped to live in the ramshackle palace his family had called home for generations. In her adjustment to rural Indian life, Gee examines how far we're willing to go for love, and what truly makes a home. 

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Christa Parravani

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Christa Parravani (Her)

Monday, March 18, 7 pm, at Book Passage Corte Madera (51 Tamal Vista Blvd.)

Tuesday, March 19, 1 pm, at the Belmont Library (1110 Alameda de las Pulgas)

Award-winning photographer Parravani and her twin sister Cara were, like many other twins, so close that they transcended sisterhood and even best friendship. But after Cara was viciously raped, she spiraled into depression and drug addiction, ultimately overdosing at 28. Left to pick up the pieces, Parravani discovered that when one twin dies, the remaining twin has a 50-50 chance of dying within the next two years. She began abusing pills and starving herself, and had visions and delusions of her sister (also common among surviving twins) that threatened to rip her life apart. Her acclaimed memoir details how she was able to emerge from her grief and find her own path. 

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Mary Johnson

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Mary Johnson (An Unquenchable Thirst)

Tuesday, March 12, 7 pm, at Book Passage Corte Madera (51 Tamal Vista Blvd.)

After seeing a Time cover story on Mother Teresa, then 19-year-old Johnson decided that working with the nuns in the legendary humanitarian's order was her purpose in life. She traveled to India and joined the Missionaries of Charity, but struggled to adapt the life of an American teenager to the intense strictures of the order; eventually, after 20 years, she left to find her own path. Her memoir tells the story of her time in India and how she's reacclimated to life in the U.S. 

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Karen Russell (Vampires in the Lemon Grove)

Wednesday, February 27, 7 pm, at Book Passage Corte Madera (51 Tamal Vista Blvd.)

Russell, who broke big with 2011's Pulitzer-nominated Swamplandia!, has returned with her second collection of short stories, which combines her trademark interest in all things quirky and supernatural with her dry wit and insight into modern life. Whether she's writing about silk-factory workers who turn into silkworms, a massage therapist who can heal by manipulating tattoos, or the titular blood-suckers, Russell's imagination and perspective are one-of-a-kind. 

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Madeleine Albright

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Madeleine Albright (Prague Winter)

Thursday, February 21, 7 pm, at Angelico Hall, Dominican University of California (50 Acacia Ave., San Rafael)

Reading Roundup: This Week's Top Literary Events

Each week, we offer a roundup of the best literary events in the city. All events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. Want to submit an upcoming event for consideration? Go here.

Nigella Lawson (Nigellissima: Easy Italian-Inspired Recipes

Friday, February 15, 6 pm, at Book Passage SF (1 Ferry Building)

Saturday, February 16, 12:30 pm, at Left Bank (507 Magnolia Ave., Larkspur)

Saturday, February 16, 5 pm, at Williams-Sonoma (340 Post St.)

Lawson, the British "domestic goddess," TV star, and author of eight cookbooks, goes Italian in her latest tome, with 120 recipes for pastas, main courses, and desserts inspired by the simplicity and purity of Italian cuisine. If you'd like to taste a meal prepared by Lawson herself, the Left Bank event will feature multiple courses of recipes straight from the book, paired with wine; tickets are $125 and include tax, tip, and a signed copy. 

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