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Ed Helms

Mill Valley Reveals 2011 Festival Lineup

Organizers of the 34th Mill Valley Film Festival, an 11-day celebration of independent and international cinema that kicked off last year with the Northern California premiere of eventual Best Picture winner The King's Speech, have unveiled this year's lineup, including festival openers Albert Nobbs and Jeff Who Lives at Home.

Sound, Fury and Firewater, Signifying Nothing: 'The Hangover Part II'

A seemingly interminable slog through the Bangkok underworld, where a familiar scenario plays itself out to the point of exhaustion for three wedding-bound wrecks – searching once more for a misplaced buddy – arrives by way of The Hangover Part II. Whether nostalgia in this case breeds delight or contempt depends on which aspects of the original Hangover (2009) you remember most fondly.

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

The International Asian American Film Festival heads south to San Jose through March 20, paving the way for next week's return of the Disposable Film Festival, a four-day celebration of do-it-yourself filmmaking kicking off at the Castro on Thursday. Looking for more immediate gratification? Try tonight's debut of The Lincoln Lawyer – a must-see for fans of law, order and Matthew McConaughey's down-home Southern drawl – at the Sundance Kabuki.

1. The Disposable Film Festival's Competitive Shorts Night

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

With roughly 120 films to complement its delectable menu of musical performances and interactive-art exhibits, the 29th International Asian American Film Festival is now underway, through March 20, in San Francisco, Berkeley and San Jose. For tickets, click here. Elsewhere:

1. Dazed and Confused

Where: Red Vic Movie House, 1727 Haight St., 415-668-3994
When: March 15-16

Todd Phillips Delivers a Most Welcome 'Hangover'

Todd Phillips may never be afforded the same respect as his more venerated peers, if only because directors who spend their careers chronicling the foolishness of badly behaving men rarely do. But it’s hard to ignore his track record.

Save for his remake of Robert Hamer’s 1960 comedy School for Scoundrels, unseen by me but roundly dismissed by others, Phillips has earned justified praise for his affable depictions of testosterone-driven silliness in movies like Road Trip and Old School. The Hangover finds him going to the well once more, with results that are laughably deranged but hardly preposterous to anyone who’s ever lost a weekend in Vegas.

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