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James Gandolfini

John Turturro Reveals His 'Passione' for Naples at SF Film Society's New Theater

It is a typically frantic morning in New York’s theater district, where this evening John Turturro will pay tribute of sorts to two collaborators past: Woody Allen, for whom he played a writer in Hannah and Her Sisters, and Ethan Coen, who cast the Brooklyn native in movies including Barton Fink, Miller’s Crossing, The Big Lebowski and O Brother, Where Art Thou. Yet Turturro will never take the stage.

A Sopranos Reunion, Sort Of

David Chase, creator of HBO’s dearly departed The Sopranos, is planning to reunite with one of his best-known stars from the New Jersey-based mob drama, but no need to choke on your Cannoli – it’s not James Gandolfini. 

Longtime E Street Band guitarist and Sopranos co-star Steven Van Zandt will produce the music for the director’s feature debut, an as-yet-untitled music-driven coming-of-age story set in 1960s suburbia.
Production is set to begin in January 2011.


Also a creative force behind the 1990 CBS comedy series Northern Exposure, Chase revealed that actors John Magaro (Wes Craven's My Soul to Take) and Jack Huston (HBO’s Boardwalk Empire) will star, with the first-time director working from an original script.

Looking Back: The Best (and Worst) Films of 2009

This has been heralded as the year of the animated movie, and with good reason: Fantastic Mr. Fox, Coraline and Up, among others, proved as engaging for adults as for children, validating a genre unfairly dismissed as kiddie fare by some critics and too many Oscar voters.

To me, 2009 was most memorable for its documentaries. Tyson, Capitalism: A Love Story, The Beaches of Agnes and The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers entertained as well as informed, and all remain worthy candidates for end-of-the-year accolades. Consider them (as well as Spike Jonze's Where the Wild Things Are) runners-up to my list of the year’s best films.

The Best

The Rumpus Starts: Spike Jonze, Dave Eggers and Catherine Keener on 'Where the Wild Things Are'

Long considered unfilmable, much to the chagrin of Hollywood studios hoping to capitalize on its enduring popularity, Maurice Sendak’s 1963 children’s book Where the Wild Things Are is hardly plot-heavy. At 20 pages and 10 sentences in length, Sendak’s vision is communicated primarily through his handsome, evocative illustrations.

Now, after nearly two decades of false starts and delayed release dates, comes director Spike Jonze’s big-screen adaptation, fleshed out on the written page by Jonze, whose Being John Malkovich (1999) impressed Sendak, and Dave Eggers, author of the bestselling Pulitzer Prize finalist A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius.

Were they tempted to take liberties with Sendak’s minimalist prose?

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

After a surprisingly funny cameo in Todd Phillips' smash comedy The Hangover, "Iron" Mike Tyson returns to the big screen this Sunday for a two-night stand at the Red Vic. Catch him if you can. If not, there are plenty of worthwhile alternatives playing this week at an indie theater near you.

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

The release of G.I. Joe marks the unofficial end of the summer blockbuster season, meaning it's only a few weeks until the major studios will begin to unveil what they consider the year's strongest awards contenders. Until then, here's a list of the finest films showing this week at an indie theater near you.

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

Only a week left until G.I. Joe and Meryl Streep’s Julia Child bull their way onto the big screen. Can you contain your excitement? Until then, here are some of the most intriguing selections now playing at an indie theater near you.

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

The Jewish Film Festival is entering its first weekend, the Red Vic is celebrating its 29th birthday, and David Byrne's Talking Heads are taking the stage (in a manner of speaking) for two nights only. It's looking like a promising week for moviegoers seeking an alternative to the mindless savagery of Orphan and the magical incantations of Harry Potter. Here's a list of some of the finest films arriving at an indie theater near you.

Blood on the Tracks: The Remaking of 'Pelham 1 2 3'

If Joseph Sargent’s original Taking of Pelham One Two Three seemed to capture the essence of New York at its mid-’70s nadir – overrun with crime and teetering on the verge of bankruptcy, its world-weary residents conditioned to expect the worst and hardly surprised when it happened – Tony Scott’s slick, competently staged remake is a warmed-over exercise in style.

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