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Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

Hungry for something new? Head to the Roxie this weekend for San Francisco's annual International Festival of Short Films, featuring dozens of cutting-edge documentaries, music videos and animations representing 20 countries. Otherwise, check yourself into the Castro for a week of bona-fide American classics, including:

1.
Ferris Bueller's Day Off
Where:
Castro Theatre, 429 Castro St., 415-621-6120
When: Sept. 9

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

If your post-holiday plans don't involve football and a tryptophan-induced nap, make your way to Embarcadero Center, where some of this year's strongest Oscar contenders, including 127 Hours and Fair Game, are now playing. Check out the Castro's two-day celebration of Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy, beginning Saturday. Or update your Netflix queue to include John Hughes' classic Thanksgiving comedy Planes, Trains & Automobiles. Happy Turkey Day!

1. Animal Kingdom

Link Love: A Tribute to John Hughes, Meggings and More

Daily reads from our feeds …

Fashionista pays homage to John Hughes with a look back at their favorite style moments from his iconic brat pack films.

Get spiked. Thin wallets leave us with little money for new shoes, but this new multi-purpose add-on accessory is a trend we can afford. (via Refinery 29)

John Hughes, 1950-2009

John Hughes, the Michigan-born director of ’80s teen comedies including Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, has died of a heart attack in Manhattan. He was 59.

Hughes, who rose to fame in the early ’80s on the strength of his script for National Lampoon's Vacation, made his directorial debut in 1984 with Sixteen Candles. He was largely instrumental in launching the careers of John Cusack, Anthony Michael Hall, Macauley Culkin and Molly Ringwald.

Judd Apatow on the Well-Masked Anxieties of 'Funny People'

Judd Apatow is no stranger to labels.

Roger Ebert, Variety and ABC’s Nightline have independently declared him Hollywood’s new King of Comedy. The editors of Vanity Fair and the Los Angeles Times downgraded him to Mayor, though their praise was otherwise no less effusive. And Inside the Actors Studio host James Lipton, never one to withhold a compliment, recently branded Apatow a “genius.”

But believe it or not, there was a time when the Syosset, New York, native, then in his early 20s, struggled to sustain a career as a stand-up comedian. Although he conceded that battle, choosing instead to write for fellow stand-ups like Roseanne Barr, his passion for the craft remained undiminished.

Relive Some Teen Angst with Pretty in Pink in Dolores Park

Film Night returns to Dolores Park this Saturday (8pm) with one of cinema's most epic tales of unrequited love, class conflict, and social angst: "Pretty In Pink." Molly Ringwald plays Andie, a Chicago high school senior from the wrong-side-of-the-tracks who has a thing for rich and hunky Blane McDonough (Andrew McCarthy). Meanwhile, Andie's dorky friend Ducky (Jon Cryer) obsesses over her to the point of stalking. Andie is the ultimate icon for trendy Missionites: she works at a record store and turns secondhand clothes into quirky DIY New Wave ensembles. At least on Saturday night, the Mission's current 80s flashback fashion trend will seem more like appropriate costuming than attempted-and-failed irony.

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