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Johnny Cash

Nubile Inmates Take Back the Asylum in Zack Snyder's Stylish 'Sucker Punch'

Having joined the ranks of today’s most promising young directors after first crafting music videos for Morrissey and Dionne Farris, Zack Snyder has skillfully married his passion for song with his inclination to grandiose cinema.
 
Whether thrusting us into a world on the brink of apocalypse against the haunting strains of Johnny Cash’s “The Man Comes Around” in Dawn of the Dead (2004), or opening his adaptation of Alan Moore’s Watchmen (2009) with a condensed century of superhero history backed by Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are a-Changin’,” Snyder has a Midas touch in the soundtrack department.
 

Behind-The-Scenes Jim Marshall Photos of Johnny Cash's Folsom Prison Concert on View @ SF Arts Exchange

Johnny Cash, Folsom Prison 1968. © Jim Marshall Photography LLC

Last year, Chronicle Books published Pocket Cash, a stunning book of Johnny Cash images by world-renowned rock photographer and San Francisco native Jim Marshall. The local legend passed away last year, but he continues to live on through his incredible body of work. Now, you have the chance to see some of the shots from the book come to life in a special exhibit at the San Francisco Arts Exchange.

Rookie Marin Filmmakers Recruit Ed Harris to Star in Their Own Family Drama

Even a cursory glance at his résumé should tell you that four-time Oscar nominee Ed Harris, 59, has never hesitated to take chances, as he did when he made his directorial debut with Pollock (2000), a startlingly intense portrait of the tortured American painter. But this is pushing it.

Approached backstage at the Castro Theatre in 2006 by identical twins Logan and Noah Miller, who identified themselves only as “the independent filmmakers,” Harris did what few stars of his stature would: He listened to their feverish pitch for Touching Home, the new drama about two baseball-obsessed brothers struggling to reconnect with an alcoholic father.

Noise Pop Film: Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison

Don't get your hopes up. There's no recently unearthed footage of the legendary live album in Bestor Cram's documentary, At Folsom Prison, but there's a decent montage of photographer Jim Marshall's stills from this career-defining performance of The Man in Black. Additional video includes interviews with his children, Roseanne Cash and John Carter Cash, former inmate Millford Derdon who was there for the show, and the two children of Folsom inmate Glen Sherley whose song, "Greystone Chapel," was learned the night before the show by Cash and his band and performed that day. Artsy animated interpretations of songs from the album and archival film of the era round out the visuals.

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