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Kodi Smit-McPhee

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

With Noir City 9 descending on the Castro for the next 10 days and San Francisco's 13th Independent Film Festival arriving in early February, the new year is already heating up for local cinephiles. Here, as always, are some of the finest selections currently playing at an indie theater (and, in this week's edition, a Loews cineplex) near you.

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. Barney's Version

Matt Reeves Explains the Need to Remake a Vampire Classic with 'Let Me In'

For fans of the 2008 Swedish import Let the Right One In who have angrily littered the Internet with cries of blasphemous imitation, Chloë Moretz, the 13-year-old star of Let Me In, opening Friday, has a simple request: Give Matt Reeves’ remake a chance.
 
“Put aside the controversy and watch the movie,” says Moretz, who plays Abby, a centuries-old vampire trapped in the pale, deceptively frail-looking body of a 12-year-old. “See if you take something new from it.”
 

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

With the Dec. 31 deadline for 2009 Academy Award consideration fast approaching and at least one surefire Best Picture contender – Jason Reitman's Up in the Air – arriving at theaters this weekend, it's a perfect time to catch a movie. As always, here's a list of the finest films now playing at your local indie theaters.

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

Once you're finished scouring the city for the season's best Black Friday bargains, settle into a darkened theater to catch this year's Oscar hopefuls, including Fantastic Mr. Fox, which should give Pixar's Up fierce competition for Best Animated Feature. To help you on your way, here's a list of the finest films now playing at your local indie theaters.

Cormac McCarthy's 'Road' Translates into a Harrowing On-Screen Journey

Whether a movie could be made of Cormac McCarthy’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Road was once the subject of spirited debate. The story of a father and son braving the ruins of post-apocalyptic America has been called unfilmable, yet here is John Hillcoat’s reverent adaptation, faithful to the letter and the spirit, relentlessly bleak but with a sliver of hope for the future.

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