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Oliver Stone

Home Movies: Hugo Chávez, Raúl Castro Host Oliver Stone's 'Border' Vacation

The primary theme of Oliver Stone’s South of the Border, in which the JFK director checks his trademark paranoia at the door to interview South American heads of state including Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez, Argentina’s Cristina Fernández de Kirchner and Brazil’s Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, is distrust of the U.S.-controlled International Monetary Fund. While only Chávez is openly contemptuous of Washington, none of those interviewed seem much interested in bending to America’s will.
 

Woody Allen Struggles with the Agony of Creation and the Perils of Wish Fulfillment with 'You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger'

Perhaps old dogs can’t be taught new tricks, but many veteran directors are learning to adapt in a Hollywood where sequels, remakes and treatments of popular comics are very much in season.
 
This fall, Stephen Frears, 69, will unveil his first take on a graphic novel, the romantic comedy Tamara Drewe, before tentatively laying the groundwork for a remake of his 1984 thriller The Hit. Oliver Stone, 64, has returned to Wall Street. And, at 67, Martin Scorsese is busy directing his first 3-D fantasy – next winter’s Hugo Cabret – and planning a Taxi Driver sequel.
 

Oliver Stone's Stock Drops with Unfocused Return to 'Wall Street'

Perhaps the greatest validation of Wall Street, Oliver Stone’s eloquent 1987 take on big-business corruption, was the eventual exposure of white-collar con men like Kenneth Lay and Bernie Madoff, whose unchecked greed would, years later, cost those who trusted them – and America – dearly.

Stone could at this point have let the facts speak for themselves, but instead chose to resurrect Gordon Gekko, the reptilian corporate raider, made famous by Michael Douglas, whose credo – “greed is good” – became the unofficial mantra of the Me Generation.

Michael Douglas Revisits Past Glories with Renewed Vigor in ‘Solitary Man’

I have not yet seen Wall Street 2, Oliver Stone’s forthcoming sequel to the 1987 drama that introduced us to Michael Douglas’ Gordon Gekko, the reptilian stock-market overlord who coined the unofficial ’80s motto, “Greed is good.” But I cannot imagine a more fitting coda to Gekko’s saga than Brian Koppelman’s story of a down-on-his-luck car dealer nosediving to the nadir of a midlife crisis.

Notes From a Darkened Theater: Corey Haim, of ‘Lucas’ and ‘The Lost Boys,’ Dead at 38

Corey Haim, who starred in popular teen comedies including Lucas (1986), License to Drive (1988) and Dream a Little Dream (1989), as well as Joel Schumacher’s 1987 cult hit The Lost Boys, has died at 38 of what is believed to be an accidental drug overdose.

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