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Paul Rudd

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

Seeking an antidote to the holiday season's traditional tidings of great joy? Director Takeshi Kitano (1997's Fireworks) returns this week at the Lumiere Theatre with Outrage, a bloody, deliriously eccentric gangland drama about rival yakuza clans competing for the favor of their head family in the Japanese underworld. Elsewhere:

1.
Noir City Xmas
Where: Castro Theatre, 429 Castro St., 415-621-6120
When: Dec. 14

Elizabeth Banks Relates to Dysfunctional Siblings of 'Our Idiot Brother'

It comes as little surprise that Our Idiot Brother, Jesse Peretz’s low-key comedy about three crisis-prone sisters perpetually irritated by their free-spirited brother, is at least partially autobiographical.

Written by his sister, Evgenia, and her husband David Schisgall, the movie features bits and pieces of real life sprinkled into the fiction: Career-driven sister Miranda – a dirt-digging Vanity Fair writer played by Elizabeth Banks – works at the same magazine where Evgenia has served as a contributing editor since 1999. (Her only concession to VF, mandated by editor Graydon Carter, was that Miranda adhere to some degree of journalistic integrity.)
 

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

The wait is over. After a brief, regrettable hiatus, the Indie Theater Roundup is back, locked and loaded for a long summer, ready with the antidote to the foppish banality of Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides and the calculated naughtiness of The Hangover Part II. So, without further ado:

1. A Place in the Sun

Where: Castro Theatre, 429 Castro St., 415-621-6120
When: May 28

'Dinner for Schmucks' Leaves Sour Aftertaste

What a disheartening spectacle we have in Dinner for Schmucks, the latest comedy since April’s Date Night to squander Steve Carell’s impeccable timing and frantic, Clouseau-like cluelessness.

For better and more often worse, we see in Barry, his latest on-screen buffoon, a character reminiscent of Michael Scott, the deluded desk jockey he plays on NBC’s The Office. Nearly paralyzed by his own stupidity, hopelessly oblivious in every aspect of his modest existence, Barry is a tragic figure, in part because of the pain behind his manic grin, and in part because he’s so easy to despise.

Paul Rudd and Jason Segel on Being "Manpanions"

For Paul Rudd and Jason Segel, friends whose acting careers have been entwined since they first worked together in Judd Apatow’s Knocked Up, life professionally has rarely looked brighter.

Proclaimed two of comedy’s new legends in a recent issue of Vanity Fair, Rudd, 39, and Segel, 29, have shared the screen twice in the past, as supporting players in Knocked Up and more recently as mismatched surfing partners in last year’s Forgetting Sarah Marshall, which Segel wrote. But never before have they shared top billing, as they do in I Love You, Man, a platonic romance about a pair of incipient bosom buddies.

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