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Pedro Almodóvar

Together Again: Almodóvar, Banderas Reveal New Bag of Tricks for 'Skin I Live In'

It’s common for critics to describe one movie by comparing it to another, as if, unable to accept something new on its own terms, they must fall back on whatever pre-existing standard is most convenient. It is a practice that seems to rankle filmmakers, who usually prefer to treat their ideas as immaculate conceptions rather than share the credit with peers.
 
It is startling, then, that Pedro Almodóvar, the celebrated Spanish auteur whose grotesque drama The Skin I Live In is now playing at the Embarcadero Center Cinema and the Sundance Kabuki Cinemas, is so quick to liken his latest to recent offerings by Terrence Malick and Danish provocateur Lars von Trier.
 

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 More Movies to See at Docfest

While Pedro Almodóvar celebrates his long-delayed reunion with Antonio Banderas in the twisted new thriller The Skin I Live In, opening this weekend at the Embarcadero, SF IndieFest's 10th Documentary Festival enters its second week at the Roxie Theater, with a mostly all-new lineup of features from some of the world's most daring nonfiction filmmakers. Here's a sampling of the festival's best.

1. Being Elmo: A Puppeteer's Journey

Where:
Roxie Theater, 3117 16th St., 415-863-1087

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

Pedro Almodóvar takes over the Castro starting Wednesday, as Spain's most internationally acclaimed auteur (whose latest offering, The Skin I Live In, arrives in October) is honored with three double-features, featuring Bad Education, Talk to Her, All About My Mother and Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. Elsewhere:

1. Grease
Sing-Along
Where: Castro Theatre, 429 Castro St., 415-621-6120
When: Aug. 12-14

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

January is traditionally a time for Hollywood studios to empty their storage lockers, tossing out the trash (like last winter's Bride Wars) and dusting off movies previously unreleased due to scheduling conflicts. No matter. The city's indie theaters remain a premier destination for cinephiles in search of top-flight documentaries (What's the Matter with Kansas?), cheerfully twisted fantasies (The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus) and Oscar front-runners like The Hurt Locker and A Serious Man.

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

'Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house, not a creature was stirring... except yours truly, wrapping last-minute presents, watching Iron Chef America reruns, and writing blurbs for the final Indie Theater Roundup of 2009. Please put them to good use (the blurbs, that is) and have a safe, happy holiday.

1. The Bicycle Thief

Where: Roxie Theater, 3117 16th St., 415-863-1087
When: All Week

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

With Christmas, Kwanzaa and Festivus just a week away, the holiday season is in full swing, the malls are packed with last-minute shoppers, and the city's indie theaters are playing host to some of the year's most satisfying films.

Pedro Almodóvar, Penélope Cruz Find Passion in ‘Broken Embraces’

Mateo Blanco, the great Spanish director, is blind. Or is he? We first meet him as he’s luring a beautiful woman into his home to read him the newspaper. What does she look like, he wonders. She tells him, down to the most intimate details. He asks permission to touch her, to feel with his hands what his eyes can’t see. They make love.

Woody Allen on Hollywood, Penélope Cruz and the Joys of Being a Foreign Filmmaker

Hyperbole runs rampant in the entertainment industry, but it’s hardly effusive to call Woody Allen a living legend.

At 72, the Brooklyn-born director of Annie Hall and Manhattan has received 21 Oscar nominations during his four-plus decades behind the camera, taking home the statuette three times. He has expanded his canon at the astonishing rate of a movie each year since 1992, and his latest, the remarkable romantic comedy Vicky Cristina Barcelona, won an Academy Award nomination for Penélope Cruz. In short, he has earned his place in the fraternity of the finest filmmakers of any era: among them, Fellini, Scorsese and the man Allen once described as “the great cinematic poet of morality,” Ingmar Bergman.

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