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Peter Sarsgaard

Dog Days Ahead: June Movie Preview

Just as winter is the season of Oscar hopefuls, the dog days belong to big-budget popcorn fare – star-studded comedies, explosive adventures and comic-book crusaders bent on saving humanity from imminent destruction. This June will be no different, with a strong crop of contenders mining for box-office gold, including:

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

Happy New Year! As you all know, there is no better way to treat a holiday hangover than with an afternoon matinee. (Actually, that's not true. I recommend water, sports drinks that contain electrolytes, saltine crackers and, if possible, a full-body massage. And don't forget a healthy breakfast. Eating, like reading my columns, is fundamental.)

So once you're back on your feet and ready to venture out into the brave new world of 2010, be sure to check out these fine movies, now playing at an indie theater near you.

1. You, the Living

Where: Red Vic Movie House, 1727 Haight St., 415-668-3994
When: Jan. 3-4

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

For those seeking alternatives to this weekend's surefire blockbuster – the teenage romance New Moon – there are plenty of worthy options now playing at the Bay Area's indie theaters. Among them:

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

A pair of anti-corporate celebrations of muckraking arrive at the Roxie this week, where The Yes Men Fix the World documents a series of elaborate pranks aimed at exposing hypocrisy and "unmasking global injustice," and Michael Moore's Capitalism: A Love Story takes its final bow before exiting theaters. Elsewhere:

Indie Theater Roundup: 7 Movies to See This Week

The San Francisco Film Society's French Cinema Now, a seven-day event featuring the latest offerings from directors Michel Gondry (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind) and Claude Chabrol (A Girl Cut in Two), continues through Wednesday at the Clay Theatre.

Mysteries of Pittsburgh: A Strangely Flat Adaptation of Michael Chabon’s First Novel

For all the youthful hedonism and reckless behavior on display in Rawson Marshall Thurber’s Mysteries of Pittsburgh, his strangely stillborn adaptation of Michael Chabon’s first novel, there’s something sorely missing – a sense of danger, perhaps, or a hint of intrigue.

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