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recipes

Tartine's Heavenly Morning Buns Recipe

Lovers of Tartine’s legendary morning buns have noticed the recipe’s absence from the pages of the bakery’s cookbook, Tartine (Chronicle Books), published last August. “We didn’t do it on purpose,” says co-owner Elisabeth Prueitt, who’s been surprised at the number of calls and emails she’s had from people requesting it. Although she plans to put the recipe on Tartine’s own website soon, for immediate sweet-tooth satisfaction, we've got the recipe right here.

Tartine 600 Guerrero St., 415-487-2600

The Perfect Fall Cocktail

A week ago, I didn't think I'd be able to write this post about autumnal drinks. But then the fog rolled in, and with it came the rain, and then all of a sudden it did feel like fall. The proverbial frost is on the proverbial pumpkin. Which is great news, because now I can tell you about this great new book of cocktail recipes from Scott Beattie, the man behind the bar at Cyrus in Healdsburg, called Artisanal Cocktails: Drinks inspired by the seasons from the bar at Cyrus.

Absinthe's Hot Toddy Recipe


I’ve heard that in places where the days are very short in the winter—Alaska, Finland, Iceland—that people drink a lot more. This makes perfect sense to me—I mean, what else are you going to do? Drinking is a good way to defend against cold and darkness, particularly if the beverages in question are hi-test and hot. We’re here to report on a happy little phenomenon sweeping our freezing, fogged-in city: the resurgence of the boozy, hot drink.

Turn a Pumpkin Carving Mishap Into This Cake

I've got pumpkins and squash on the brain lately. The first few squash made their way into my farm box this week, but not before I unknowingly spent $6 ($6!!) for an organic butternut specimen at Whole Foods. Let me repeat—butternut squash. Six dollars. What's that about the economy going to hell? Today, I had a pumpkin-shaped chocolate as my "afternoon dessert," a ritual I strongly encourage all of you to adopt. And over the weekend, I had the pleasure of driving around Sonoma at sunset and passed a bunch of pumpkin patches, filled with white and orange orbs. I would have bought some, but as everything I put on my stoop gets stolen, I just admired from afar.  Now I wish I'd bought a few sugar pumpkins so I could use fresh pumpkin puree for this handsome coffeecake. It looks like just the thing to ring in the season. Invite over a handful of friends for Sunday brunch and serve this, or bake it up on Sunday and bring it to some lucky ducks at your office Monday morning. Note: if you can't find fresh cranberries, they are available frozen at Whole Foods. And they don't cost $6 a bag.

Tyler Florence's Peach, Fennel, Mozzarella and Crispy Prosciutto Salad

You see, there's this guy, Tyler Florence. Maybe you've heard of him? Well, you're about to hear a whole lot more, because in addition to his new store in Mill Valley and two new cookbooks, he's also about to open a restaurant in San Francisco, housed in the Hotel Vertigo (and named, of course, Bar Florence), scheduled to make its debut in December. Still, his two cookbooks are filled with simple recipes for make-at-home food and this salad is just the thing to make this weekend, while the weather is warm and before the last few peaches vanish for another season.

Goat cheese and green onion galette from Joanne Weir's Wine Country Cooking

Hey, it's like fall out there. This strikes us as the perfect tart for a cool night, maybe with a cup of soup or salad beside. The perfect recipe for meat-eaters and vegetarians alike, and equally good, we suspect, for breakfast, lunch, brunch, or a light dinner. Go on, make it. You know you want to.

Goat Cheese and Green Onion Galette


A galette is a fancy way of saying “a thin pie.” This one has a crunchy dough, rich with butter, that is a perfect casing for creamy ricotta, crème fraîche, mozzarella, fresh green onions, and Parmigiano. You’ll see why this has been one of my all-time favorites for years.

11/2 cups all-purpose flour

Mayacoba Bean Salad with Pesto and Shrimp from Steve Sando's Heirloom Beans

Even if you don't know Steve Sando by name, you're probably familiar with his heirloom beans, which he grows on his farm in Napa, Rancho Gordo, and sells at the Saturday farmers market at the Ferry Building. His new cookbook, written with co-author Vanessa Barrington, is chock-a-block full of delicious-sounding recipes, from spring lamb with flageolets to Anasazi cowboy chili. If you can't make it to the farmers market, you can also find Rancho Gordo beans in the bulk bins at Rainbow Grocery. If your experience with beans is limited to the canned variety, you're in for a treat. Sando's varieties (with such fun names as Marrow Beans, Black Valentine and Appaloosa) are toothsome and tasty.

Mayacoba Bean Salad with Pesto and Shrimp

Grilled Halibut from Chez Panisse Chef David Tanis

Is there a restaurant in California that's more revered than Chez Panisse? We don't think so. And while we're happy to give props to Alice Waters for her role is changing the way people think about food, on the day to day basis it's her talented cooks that make that restaurant what it is. Jean-Pierre Moullé and David Tanis share the job of orchestrating the set multi-course meals in the downstairs restaurant, each of them working for six months at a time. We're thrilled that David Tanis has just published a gorgeous cookbook, A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes—with its gorgeous photographs, simple recipes and wonderful tips, it's a must buy. Especially because once we print this recipe, you are going to want more.

Grilled Pork Tenderloin and Nectarines from Larkspur's Picco

Word on the street is that we're looking at a very nice weekend ahead, weather-wise, so in the spirit of a fog-free couple of days here's a very grill-friendly recipe for grilled pork tenderloin and nectarines with a bacon vinaigrette, courtesy of one of our very favorite North Bay restaurants, Picco (yes, home of the soft-serve I blogged about some weeks back). This recipe serves four, but we're betting you could easily double or even triple it and invite a crowd. This recipe is just one of many featured in a new book titled Organic Marin: Recipes From Land to Table, which showcases recipes from great restaurants in Marin (and a few in San Francisco, too).
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