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El Cachanilla: The Perfect Tacos

I had a Technicolor food moment the other day: Running errands last weekend, on an intensely bright and beautiful Sunday, I pulled over at 21st and Treat to get a little lunch at El Cachanilla, the only taqueria in SF that transports me immediately to Mexico. The tacos are small in true antojito style, and served from a little window where your choices of meat are displayed in scratchy handwriting—in both Spanish and English. I conservatively ordered three carnitas tacos, but the sign says they offer everything from tripe to eye, neither of which have I tested out. I’m relatively hardcore, but not hardcore enough for eye taco.

Cherries and Lunch at Bushi-Tei

In our Luxury issue, due to hit newsstands any minute now, we celebrate the long-lost art of lunch. You remember lunch—that mid-day break that civilized people used to take to eat, drink and refresh their minds before heading into the afternoon. Just in time for its return, Japantown's Bushi-Tei began serving lunch two weeks ago.

Green is Good

In this age of rampant greenwashing, it’s hard to know what to believe. Everywhere you turn someone has an eco, organic, sustainable party line—how can you tell the fakers from the real deal? But there’s one business in San Francisco that setting the standard for green business, and proving that it’s possible to be both successful and conscientious: Mixt Greens.


Dear Mixt Greens,
Thanks for not trashing the planet while
making us lunch. Love, us.
Courtesy of Mixt Greens.

Candybar: No Just Desserts

I often have evenings where a sweet-tooth craving overwhelms me. One that needs to be fixed right then and there—and then I grumble (I'm a woman of more than one rant) about why on earth there isn't a place designed for these moments, places made for nothing but tucking into a piece of pie, a slice of triple-layer cake, a pudding. Something comforting and familiar. (Something like this strawberry crostata from the Zuni cookbook that my friend Alan makes. Mmmmmm.)


Domo Arigato


Welcome inside Hayes Valley's newest restaurant.
photo courtesy of Domo

Crepe O Chocolate: Food for Shop

Shopping at Barneys always leaves me full of want, yet unfulfilled. There are so many beautiful things there. So many beautiful things that I can’t afford. (This is not to say that I don’t go back often, like some sort of shopping masochist.)

Mais Oui: The French Invasion

An article that ran yesterday in the New York Times about the resurgence of French food in New York City struck a chord with me. For all of San Francisco’s Italianate leanings, the same seems to be true here—all of a sudden, the “French culinary mafia” seems once again to be picking up speed. The other night I ate at Chez Papa Resto, where my old friend David Bazirgan is the chef. David is supremely talented, and I’ll happily patronize any restaurant where he’s cooking. The food–lovely renditions of French classics given the Baz touch—seems anything but tired.

Smoking Gun: Beretta Opens

The opening of the latest place to eat and drink in the Mission District, brings up two issues:
1. How much pizza can SF take? (I’m thinking a lot, because I’m currently celebrating the close proximity this new spot to my house.)
2. Those star SF bartenders—excuse me, mixologists—sure get around. And I don’t mean in that way.

Lost in Translation: Eating LA

I’m back from spending almost a week in LA for an unofficial spring break. As Janelle Brown, the formerly SF-based author (now situated in LA’s Los Feliz hood), said to me for a recent 7x7 interview: LA and SF are like yin and yang—they fit together perfectly.

Halibut Season Has Begun

With all the fuss we make over spring vegetables, the lowly wild Alaskan halibut gets pretty short billing. The largest of all flatfish, measuring up to four feet wide, eight feet long and over 600 pounds, wild halibut is considered a good choice on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch list. Fisherman use bottom longlines that cause very little damage to the sea floor and ensure a low by-catch; the fish is considered sustainable.


That's a big fish.
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