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Photo Preview of SFMOMA's Expansion

By now, we've all been tantalized by the talk of SFMOMA's grand plans to expand the current museum. Yesterday, SFMOMA and design firm Snøhetta unveiled the mock-ups of the plan for the mammoth new wing, which will include an expanded photography collection, a dedicated architecture and design area, and the incomparable Fisher collection (which will be integrated with SFMOMA's own collection).

Three New Exhibits at SFMOMA Are Outspoken, Brilliant and Tragic

SFMOMA’s front atrium sports a handsome new fixture, and its middle floors have some outspoken new tenets. While Jim Campbell’s twinkling LED-light sculpture, Exploded Views, runs no risk of going unseen, The Air We Breathe and Francesca Woodman must vie for viewers’ attention in the shadow of a behemoth – namely, the smash-hit Richard Serra Drawing retrospective upstairs. To overlook these smaller exhibitions, one a poignant resounding on same-sex equality, the other a fascinating glimpse of a brilliant and tragic individual, would be a crime.

Triple Threat: A Night Out in Yerba Buena

If you want to have a successful night out in this town, you need a plan—and it better be a good one. Since it's not always easy to strike that perfect balance between pre-dinner drink, food and a show, we bring you the Triple Threat series — a block-by-block guide to nights out that only require one parking space. In today's edition, the part of SoMa referred to as Yerba Buena. 

Scope Rare Richard Serra Sketchbooks At SFMOMA This Month

If you’ve ever stared up at the two steel monoliths on UCSF’s Mission Bay campus or felt dwarfed by the 60-foot square tower at the Gap’s headquarters, then you’ve marveled over the brilliance of artist Richard Serra. The San Francisco native is legendary for his massive sculptures, but in October, SFMOMA highlights a lesser-known side of his artistic career in the first major museum retrospective of his works on paper.

Cities Are Good For Kids - and Kids Are Good For Cities

My son was a colicky baby, wailing for hours and up before dawn. To comfort him—and escape our cramped apartment—we would take long walks. Fortifying coffee in hand and baby in pouch, I’d scale Folsom Street and then spiral up to Bernal Heights, where we could find nature without leaving San Francisco. Once I saw an owl gripping a branch, looking back at us with agate eyes. We kept up the ritual after the fussy baby turned into a happier toddler, and we would walk side by side. Max was just 2 when he surveyed the view and said, “Our city.” Some people argue that SF is no place to raise a kid, but I’ve always felt differently.

Bay Area Indie Rockers Deerhoof Make SFMOMA Their Stage for 'BAND'

If homage, like imitation, is the sincerest form of flattery, Jean-Luc Godard should welcome BAND, New York-based artist Adam Pendleton’s touring collaboration with San Francisco experimental rockers Deerhoof, which arrives Thursday evening at the city’s Museum of Modern Art.

Godard, who chronicled the Rolling Stones studio sessions that would ultimately produce the lead track of their 1968 classic Beggars Banquet in his documentary Sympathy for the Devil, used early rehearsals of that album’s biggest hit as the backdrop for a series of visual meditations on the Black Panthers, consumerism, Marxism, democracy and the revolutionary spirit of the late ’60s.

SFMOMA and YBCA Do 'Four Saints in Three Acts' (Gertrude Stein and Virgin Thomson's Experimental Opera)

SFMOMA has joined forces with YBCA to recreate Four Saints in Three Acts, Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson’s 1934 experimental opera. The original work’s nonlinear narrative follows Teresa of Avila, Ignatius of Loyola, and other saints as they muse in heaven about their mortal lives. The multimedia adaptation maintains the essence of its predecessor but gives it a modern spin with a varied cast of collaborators that include Bay Area contemporary chamber opera group Ensemble Parallèle, composer Luciano Chessa, and New York’s hyped video-performance artist Kalup Linzy.

Hot 20 2011: Ruth Laskey, Visual artist

The Dream Weaver
Ruth Laskey, 35
Visual artist
Photographed by John Lee at the Twill House in Glen Ellen

Pop-Up Magazine Comes to the MOMA

Pop-Up Magazine isn't something you page through on the train or scroll through on your phone. Every issue of the magazine is a live performance, one night only, bringing together documentarians, writers of all kinds, photographers, and radio folks for a 90-minute show. The issue "unfolds like a magazine," with short bits first and longer pieces following. Pop-Up doesn't record the show and they don't put anything online, so if you're not there, you've missed it. Next Wednesday, March 17, Pop-Up presents the first staging of their shorter between-issue series, Sidebar, in the atrium of the SFMOMA.

SFMOMA's Voyeurism and Surveillance Exhibit: Examining the Camera's Most Unsettling Uses

Currently on exhibit until April 17 at the SFMOMA, Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance, and the Camera Since 1870 explores the watching me, watching you phenomenon as it has evolved since the early days of the camera. In an era when cameras and recording devices are ubiquitous, impacting norms around privacy and exclusivity, this exhibit is more relevant than ever.

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