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Steve Kloves

'Deathly Hallows: Part 2' a Robust Swan Song for Potter and His Magical Minions

How far Harry Potter has come, from a strictly-for-kids screen debut in The Sorcerer’s Stone (2001), which captured none of the subtlety or rich characterizations of J.K. Rowling’s addictive prose, to David Yates’ The Deathly Hallows: Part 2, a graceful swan song that witnesses the final ascent to manhood of the Boy Who Lived.
 

The End Begins Now: Wizards Go to War in 'Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows'

Rather than draw out their long goodbyes in a single sitting, as Peter Jackson’s Hobbits did in his too-long Lord of the Rings finale, Team Harry’s swan song will unfold in two parts, a decision dismissed in some quarters as purely a marketing strategy.
 
Yet even at two-and-a-half hours, the first installment of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, J.K. Rowling’s conclusion to the saga of an orphaned wizard destined to battle a Hitler-like menace, sacrifices some particulars of the author’s story but emerges as the most faithful adaptation in the series. Readers expecting everything plus the kitchen sink – or, in this case, seven magical Horcruxes – should not be disappointed.
 

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