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Tom Hanks

‘Toy Story 3’ a Worthy Addition to the Pixar Oeuvre

Has Pixar set the bar too high? There’s nothing really wrong with Toy Story 3 – on the contrary, there’s so much right that it would be tempting to overlook its shortcomings altogether. But we get paid for full-service reviews, so it is with slight hesitation that I applaud the conclusion of a memorable trilogy.

Why the misgiving? Everything would appear to be in place. Pixar once again has created a spectacle unlike any other, unsurpassed in its visual brilliance and in the richness of detail evident in its characters and the world they inhabit. It is a movie that demands repeat viewings, as the intricacies of its artwork can’t be appreciated fully in a single sitting.

‘Toy Story 3’ Stars Sing the Praises of Pixar

Walk into the adult-friendly playground that is the Pixar Animation Studios in Emeryville, and the first thing that strikes you is the lavish decorations – a life-size replica of Ken’s decadent dollhouse from Toy Story 3, complete with a working elevator, rising from the lobby’s handsome, light-blond hardwood floor as if in tribute to the movie and its detail-obsessed creators.

Home Movies: 'Angels & Demons' a Biblical Bore

Rarely before has wordy exposition been employed more excessively and to lesser effect than in Angels & Demons, Ron Howard’s middling follow-up to The Da Vinci Code.

For those craving action and suspense, there’s little to be found here, despite a whirlwind denouement that sees our hero, Harvard professor and renowned symbologist Robert Langdon (Tom Hanks), racing around Rome in search of an Illuminati killer. (More on that later.) Instead, screenwriters David Koepp and Akiva Goldsman subject us to a heavy-handed history lesson about the Catholic church that owes much to author Dan Brown’s tendentiously researched novel.

Where Did Julia Roberts Dine This Week in SF?

We’re not frequently star-struck, but how’s this for a celebrity sighting: Monday night, following the fundraiser for Paul Newman’s children’s camp (held at Davies Symphony Hall) none other than Julia Roberts, her husband Danny Moder, Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson, Bruce Willis, Jack Nicholson, Sean Penn, Robin Wright Penn, Billy and Janice Crystal, Danny DeVito, Bonnie Raitt and Marsha Williams gathered at Jardinière to celebrate Julia’s birthday (she turned 41)—other lucky diners heard the gang singing “Happy Birthday” to Julia and Rita (whose birthday was just a few days earlier).
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