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Thanksgiving Drinks

I can’t really tell you what we drank, but here’s what we ate.


Shroomin’



I had the great pleasure of spending the last couple of days in Mendocino, relaxing, eating and spending time searching through the woods looking for one of my favorite mushrooms—the venerable porcini. Oh, and did I mention eating?


La Gitana at Laiola



Two Saturdays ago, the incessantly rainy one, I finally made it to Laiola, though it took a bus from Union Square and a splashy mad dash in the rain down five puddle-ridden blocks to get there. Owner Joe Hargrave greeted my dripping pate inside the door, pulling a clean napkin off the shelf so I could dry off. The restaurant was packed and filled with a warm, convivial hum. The napkin gesture alone might have been enough to at least place this joint on my good side. But there was more.


Department of Ridiculous Promotions



I get quite a few samples of wine—and generally appreciate the wineries that send them. It helps me discover new wines and chart the progress of all the great labels I already know.

Sometimes, however, wineries tend to get a little too cute in the way they promote themselves. I understand the need to stand out in a highly competitive market, but occasionally it crosses the line from amusing to annoying. I’ve been shipped Walla Walla onions and a recipe for onion rings along with a Washington Merlot, and I’ve been sent an oversized oven mit, barbecue tongs and cheap sunglasses to go with some Napa cab.

Cris

Birth of a Great Lunch


Baby Shower for a Sommelier

Normally I try to avoid baby showers. They tend to be rather staid affairs with tea, crumpets, and lots of baby clothes. Actually, they’re not that hard to avoid, since I never get invited. But recently I did, and it was one I wasn’t going to miss: the baby shower for Paul Roberts, wine director for all of Thomas Keller’s restaurants, including the French Laundry and Per Se.

Seek Nua Experiences



After several months of trying, I finally made it by my friend David White’s  new (less than a year old) restaurant and wine bar Nua.

First of all, chef Anna Bautista’s menu was really excellent: we dined happily on such things as grilled octopus and chickpea salad, piquillo peppers stuffed with brandade and sardines with an eggplant caponata.

But what I’ve always admired about David White is his palate and his enthusiasm for the often overlooked wines of the world. He has a nose for well-balanced, interesting and—most important—well-priced wines. His list is full of them.

Muscadet with Soul



More famous as the classic vinous accompaniment to oysters than as a wine in and of itself, Muscadet has a fairly shoddy reputation. Most people consider Muscadet to be a bland, light-drinking, unmemorable wine. And—to be fair—most Muscadet is exactly that.

But there are exceptions. And this wine is one of them. Domaine de l'Ecu is probably the best producer in the region, making fully biodynamic wines that are true wines of minerality and terroir. The Domaine’s owner, Guy Bossard, makes three wines, each expressive of a different soil type: granite, gneiss and orthogneiss.

Turning One

The Last Days of Tomatoes

We went to the farmer’s market last weekend and bought a 20-pound flat of tomatoes ($35 from the lovely people at Ella Bella farms), as it’s one of the last weekends of dry-farmed early girl tomatoes this year. The tomatoes get softer and sweeter at the end of the season, but you want them a little earlier than that—when they still have great acidity.


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