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Eat + Drink

Market Watch: What The Chefs Are Buying

Every week, Lulu Meyer gives us the scoop on the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market.

S*@$-Slinging at Chez Panisse

I wish that this was a joke, but it's not. Two days ago I received a press release from the Organic Consumers Association with the subject line "Picket at Chez Panisse Restaurant." Picket lines? At Chez Panisse? Chez Panisse, that place in Berkeley that does everything right? Oh, California. It seems the OCA will indeed be picketing in front of the restaurant today, on the occasion of the restaurant's 30th birthday (and can we just pause for a moment to recognize that—30 years!).

Pebble Beach Food and Wine: Nice Work If You Can Get It

Whenever I consider grousing about my job, I try to remind myself that, in so many, many ways, I've got it pretty good. It's easier to remember this in early April, when the Pebble Beach Food and Wine Festival is right around the corner and, as an invited member of the press, I have the difficult decision of choosing the events I'd like to attend—a dinner with legend Jacques Pépin, a vertical tasting of some of the finest Burgundies ever made or a mid-morning Krug retrospective? The mind reels.

Lowering the Bar: 5 Places to Drink For Cheap (or Free) This Week

Each week, we bring you our top picks for the best places to booze on the cheap in SF.

1. Brown Bag Exhibition: The clothing-boutique-cum-gallery D-Structure is a reliable source of friendly Friday nights floated on free/cheap beer, cocktails, and wine. Their newest art show, Brown Bag Exhibition, is dedicated to starving artists, and features work done on or with cheapo materials. The presence of the booze isn't confirmed, but even if it's not there, you can't expect to name your gallery exhibition "Brown Bag" and not see a few Tecate tallboys wander over from the corner store, right? (Friday, April 2, 8 pm, at D-Structure, 520 Haight St., Lower Haight.)

Eat It: Lots of Lamb, Urban Agriculture and a Slow Food Seder

Edible Art Contest at Omnivore Books

For Omnivore Books’ Edible Art Contest, “participants may enter their favorite food-related books or art, in the form of an “Edible” entry.” Perhaps you’ll recreate your favorite Dutch still life? Or riff on MFK Fisher’s How to Cook a Wolf? The possibilities are endless! Participants can enter for free, eaters only are $5.

Easter Treats? A Guide to The City's Best

If you can only have one thing this Easter make it be this: Emporio Rulli Bakery's La Colomba Pasquale or “The Easter Dove”, a lighter, more citrusy version of panettone. The fluffy sweet bread made with candied orange peels, almond paste, and powdered sugar is baked in a dove-shaped paper mold. Amazing.

For kids, Cocoabella’s got the ultimate Easter basket ($50). The multicolor weaved basket features delicious milk chocolate covered gummi bears, a milk chocolate egg house, a chocolate bunny and crème brulee Eggs.

Rabbit: Where to Find It, How to Cook It and What to Serve It With

Deep Dish: Mission Beach Café devotes every Tuesday to several varieties of pot pie. The rabbit version is loaded with vegetables—turnips, English peas, carrots and parsnips—that could have been stolen straight from Farmer Brown’s garden. 198 Guerrero St., 415-861-0198, missionbeachcafesf.com

Portland to Get a Taste of SF

Here's the good news—the team behind Town Hall, Salt House and Anchor & Hope (brothers Mitch and Steve Rosenthal and Doug Washington) is opening a new restuarant. The bad news? The new restaurant, Irving Street Kitchen, is in Portland, Oregon. Like their restaurants here in San Francisco, Irving Street is housed within a historic building in the Pearl district, amidst many other repurposed warehouses—the construction photos above reveal a very familiar landscape. Not that there's anything wrong with that—the three restaurants they own now have been  huge hits here in San Francisco, and we're betting they'll do just as well up North.

The Ultimate Five-Bottle Bar, Perfect for Apartment Dwelling

What happens when the city’s top bartenders are forced to choose? Introducing the ultimate five-bottle bar, perfectly sized for apartment dwelling.

Marlowe: South Food and Wine Transforms Into a Cal-Bistro

If there’s one thing that doesn’t fly during a downturn, it’s the status quo. But when faced with the option of either shuttering or reinventing, restaurateurs have been opting for the latter, like Madonnas of the dining world. Although Acme Chophouse has just changed into Mijita/Public House, a proven success of this kind of 180 would be Coco500, which, until 2005, was Loretta Keller’s beloved Bizou.

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